Cover Design by Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal 

Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019

Literature and Interdisciplinary Studies 

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019

 

Sl. No

Title

Section

Page

 

Editorial

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editorial

i-iii

1

Connecting the Literature of Children and Adult: Socio-Political Commentary in Fantasy Tales like The Little Prince and Animal Farm

Dr. Paromita Mukherjee

Article

1-7

2

Boundaries of the self: Vignettes of the female gothic in Wuthering Heights and Villette

Dr. Malini Mukherjee

Article

8-14

3

Rumi and Iqbal’s Concept of Divine Love, A Brief Analysis

Dr Ateequllah Dar

Article

15-22

4

Pop Music, Literature and Gender: Perceptions of Womanhood in Grande’s “God Is a Woman” and Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

Chidimma Nwabueze

Article

23-33

5

Fragmented Self: Hawthorne’s Prescient Eye in “The Prophetic Pictures” and “Wakefield”

Naruhiko Mikado

Article

34-40

6

Such a Long Journey: A tale of the Indian Parsis and Indian Politics

Ipsita Seth Biswas

Article

41-46

7

The use of images and symbols in Satyajit Ray’s ‘Gupi Gain Bagha Bain’: A comprehensive study

Rajib Nandy

 

সত্যজিৎ রায়ের গুপি গাইন বাঘা বাইনচলচ্চিত্রে প্রতীকের ব্যবহার: একটি চিহ্নতাত্ত্বিক পর্যালোচনা

রাজীব নন্দী

 

Article

47-61

8

‘Meghnadabadh Kavya’ in the light of Feminist thought

Biswanath Kuiry

 

নারীবাদী ভাবনার আলোকেমেঘনাদবধ কাব্য

বিশ্বনাথ কুইরী

Article

62-69

9

One Hundred Years of Solitude: Reading Magic Realism and Alienation in their different aspects

Samaresh Mondal

 

নিঃসঙ্গতার একশ বছর: জাদুবাস্তবতা নিঃসঙ্গ জীবনের ভিন্ন সংরূপ

সমরেশ মন্ডল

Article

70-77

10

An interview with poet Prabal Kumar Basu

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

 

সাক্ষাৎকার: প্রবাল কুমার বসুর সাক্ষাৎকার নিয়েছেন অধ্যাপক শ্রীতন্বী চক্রবর্তী

Interview

78-88

11

Cloudy Monsoon

Mahfuz Al-Hossain

Poem

89

12

Ajeya (The Invincible)

Dr. Pranabes Bhattacharyya

 

অজেয়

প্রণবেশ ভট্টাচার্য্য

Poem

90

13

A Love Soaked Science Fiction

Dr. Shiv Sethi

 

Book Review

91-93

 

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief-Editor- Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief Editor- Litinfinite
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

“Every human has four endowments- self awareness, conscience, independent will and creative imagination. These give us the ultimate human freedom…the power to choose, to respond, to change.”
Stephen Covey

The idea to start an independent journal occurred to me sometimes back in 2016. The ‘independent will’ and ‘creative imagination’ perhaps wanted a more cogent and suitable platform where I could bring researchers, writers, poets, authors and book reviewers from different backgrounds, under a unified umbrella. Keeping myriad forms of development and research-oriented activities in mind, I decided to include papers that evinced serious research interest in areas not just restricted to literature, but also those that extended to other branches of humanities as well. Whether it is in the comforting sense of illusions that our country nurtures at this moment, or in the diversity of popular culture, there have been insightful comments from different sections of the academia as well as from the students, to get these documented in the form of papers, poems, articles and reviews. In a span of just three to four months from January 2019 onward, Litinfinite received an overwhelming response from research scholars all across the globe, with 18 research papers submitted. In terms of the kaleidoscopic presentation of diverse topics, the papers include American author Nathaniel Hawthorne’s fragmented self and the prescient eye in two of his novels, or in Indian English literature, in works of Amrita Pritam and Subhash Mukhopadhyay where animal tropes create differences and negative figuration through creating the ‘other’. While taking up the microcosmic facets of the marginalized Parsi community through novels in Indian English, our researchers have also worked upon the densely fragmented lives of the Parsis as represented in the novels of Rohinton Mistry. From the economic hardships faced by the Parsis in postcolonial Bombay we have a straight diversion in the humanistic doctrines of Sufism represented through Rumi’s poetry. Studying classical literature combined with medieval travel narratives and glimpses of comparative literature and comparative literary analysis have been one such domain that has enriched Litinfinte. In fact, all those multifarious developments that are visible in pop music, gender studies, race studies and cultural patterns visible in children’s literature are closely interwoven in the pages of this book. Socio-political commentaries of fables as part of a dominant pattern of cultural study are a commendable effort on part of our researchers.

The scope of indigenous literature through folklores, oral studies and local history are some of the most important ingredients that have been studied in Litinfinite. Revisiting Jalpaiguri in North Bengal has been one such study in tales and tropes about North Bengal. The indigenous flavour is continued in the creation of an alternative Feminist hegemony through texts like Mahasweta Devi’s Draupadi. There is also reference to how Spivak upholds the gendered subaltern’s impossibility to speak up or how the subalterns make themselves heard in an authorized and psychobiographically constituted society. Hence there is a fine blend of art in writing, humanitarian and social concerns along with a study in perspectives. This constant insistence on the essence of indigeneity has encouraged Litinfinite contributors to delve deeper into the nuanced aspects of Bengali as a language with all its diversities. Magic realism in Latin American literature, especially in the novels of Gabriel Garcia Marquez has received a succinct presentation in the pages of this book. Sprinkled with literary and cultural studies we also have theoretical discussions regarding the linguistic discourse in the films of Satyajit Ray. Knowing the hegemony and creating alternative paradoxes through films and literature thus receives a new impetus in this text.

If poetic diversions are akin to that of spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings, then Litinfinite bouquet is an obvious instance. The inherent thematic details of the English and the Bengali poems range from personal love, loss, betrayal, to all-pervasive social issues that are reflective at some point, didactic with a pinch of satire at the other. While Mother Nature remains desiccated under the sky, questions are hurled at Socrates through poems that lambast categorical nuances resulting into a vortex of nothingness. Art and life, and the ambiguity concerning art, body and nudity has been reflected through deft poetic strokes.

For Litinfinite we have also included articles, two special contributions, and one book review, of Radius 200 by Veena Nagpal. The compact and analytical review consists of the complicated vortex of love, betrayal and final solutions.

Litinfinite is still in an embryonic stage, trying to take recourse to a new birth everyday, with quality and imaginative master strokes. My acknowledgement goes to my editorial team and the peer-review team for their wholehearted support in this cultural venture. Their inputs were really invaluable in this regard.
I am sincerely thankful to all my contributors, and to my students who have shown their dedication in presenting some of their best works through Litinfinite. The over-enthusiastic students were always a boost to work more everyday.

Litinfinite promotes and subverts: it promotes argument, creative extravaganza; it subverts stereotypes, hypocrisy. Going beyond the known seven colours of the Vibgyor Litinfinite presents a more colourful palette, vibrant, where fantasy gets intoxicated with dollops of reality- somewhere dangling in between the words spoken and the words that are yet to be born free.

Connecting the Literature of Children and Adult: Socio-Political Commentary in Fantasy Tales like The Little Prince and Animal Farm 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.1-7

Dr. Paromita Mukherjee

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 1-7

https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.1-7

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 1-7

Connecting the Literature of Children and Adult: Socio-Political Commentary in Fantasy Tales like The Little Prince and Animal Farm

Dr. Paromita Mukherjee
Ph.D. in English Literature – University of Florida (USA)
M.A. in English Rhetoric and Professional Communication -New Mexico State University (USA)
Assistant Professor of English
Head of the Institution
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University, Kolkata, India
Email Id: pmukherjee@kol.amity.edu

Abstract

Genres of fantasy tales, inclusive of allegories, animal fables and fairy tales can provide cutting insight and clarity about the complexities of society and the intricacies of human nature. These fantasy tales may have both literal as well as symbolic meanings. However, the characters here are often animals and plants that can talk and behave like human beings. This genre of storytelling exists in virtually every culture of the world. These stories have elements of fantasy and magic that are appealing to children. However, while the magical elements in traditional fairy tales are used for the purpose of creating delight and suspense in the imaginative minds of children, other types of fantasy tales can typically have a symbolic meaning attached to them. As a result, we find the terms allegories, fables and fairy tales used quite interchangeably while talking about fantasy tales.

Keyword: Fairy Tales, Fantasy Tales, Symbols, Magic Realism, Socio-Politics

Mukherjee, Paromita. “Connecting the Literature of Children and Adult: Socio-Political Commentary in Fantasy Tales Like The Little Prince and Animal Farm.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 1. Crossref. Web.

Boundaries of the self: Vignettes of the female gothic in Wuthering Heights and Villette

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.8-14

Dr. Malini Mukherjee

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 8-14

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.8-14

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 8-14

Boundaries of the self: Vignettes of the female gothic in Wuthering Heights and Villette

Dr. Malini Mukherjee
Associate professor – Department of English
Shri Shikshayatan College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail Id: mmukherjee318@gmail.com

Abstract

The Gothic movement in English literature that started in the eighteenth century thrived on the cult of sentimentalism, sensibility and strong emotions, especially that of fear. Awakening an intensity of consciousness and a new dimension of reality, Gothic established a new relation between the Self and the world. Women novelists and the Gothic have a significant relationship since the genre was at hand for the purpose of expressing the dormant fantasies, forbidden desires and repressed passions, unthinkable to reveal otherwise for the women of the eighteenth and nineteenth century society. Boundaries of the Self and the desire to escape are the two paradoxical facets in Female Gothic during this period. Indeed, a recurring female voice of discontent and suffering amidst confinement and persecution echoes time and again in women’s Gothic fiction throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth century. The Self in chains craving for liberty, driven by an urge for transcendence is a common trope in Romanticism; when it comes to women and their predicament, it gains a special significance, since society denied them a notion of authentic Selfhood. The heyday of Gothic romance was also a time when women’s place in society was becoming a matter of increasing debate and a number of writers sought to clarify the issue. Most of these attempts to define women’s position were also attempts to confine her in a separate sphere bound by the duties of home and to ensure her participation in an ideology that limited the exercise of her physical, intellectual and emotional faculties. In women’s writings, this discontent continuously circles around the theme of the boundary of the Self.
The genre of the Gothic gives dramatic form to female anxiety of Self.Gothic romance offers a vivid expression of psychological, religious, epistemological and social anxieties that resolve themselves into a concern about the boundaries of the Self. As two of the most intensely passionate voices in English literature, both Emily and Charlotte Bronte express this anxiety in individual ways through their works. My paper will explore the portrayal of the paradoxical theme of constraints and emancipation through the nature and actions of the female protagonists in Wuthering Heights and Villette.

Keywords: Gothic, boundaries, women, passions, anxieties, constraints, transcendence

https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.8-14

Mukherjee, Malini. “Boundaries of the Self: Vignettes of the Female Gothic in Wuthering Heights and Villette.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 8. Crossref. Web.

Rumi and Iqbal’s Concept of Divine Love, a Brief Analysis

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.15-22

Dr. Ateequllah Dar

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 15-22

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.15-22

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 15-22

Rumi and Iqbal’s Concept of Divine Love, a Brief Analysis

Dr. Ateequllah Dar
M.Phil and Ph.D in Philosophy
Lecturer – Department of Philosophy
Women’s Collage, Baramulla, Kashmir, India.
President J&K Philosophy Association
Mail Id: dar.ateequllah14@gmail.com

Abstract
This paper is written on the two multi-genius thinkers who were globally acknowledged to be the greatest poet philosphers/ and mystic par-excellence of the Islamic history. Rumi (Peer-e-Rumi)belongs to 13th century and Muradee-Hindi (Iqbal) belongs to the 19th century. Both have a close affinity on many facets and were imbibed with Islamic cannons, beliefs, norms, values and injuctions. Both were adequates of love, peace and oneness of mankind. In all creations, divine love is the crux in their philosophical systems.

This paper is an attempt to highlight some similar glimpses of love as it is commonly misunderstood as solely a romantic relation between two individuals or two objects. Notwithstanding hardly anyone knows what the Divine Love is. Mere love to physical objects is an ephemeral, a lust and intense attachment of worldly pleasures which is a superficial understanding of true love. Divine Love is a central theme in their philosophy, a sublime, holy and remedy for all ailments of man’s weakness. It is an ever-going activity without ending process. It is neither lust nor phantasy. It transcendences all worldly bondage and thus makes a man ture human according to Rumi and Iqbal.

Keywords: Tranquillity, Transcendence, shilly-shalies,dilly-dallies

Dar, Ateequllah. “Rumi and Iqbal’s Concept of Divine Love, A Brief Analysis.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 15. Crossref. Web.

Pop Music, Literature and Gender: Perceptions of Womanhood in Grande’s “God Is a Woman” and Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.23-33

Chidimma Nwabueze

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 23-33

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.23-33

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 23-33

Pop Music, Literature and Gender: Perceptions of Womanhood in Grande’s “God Is a Woman” and Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

Chidimma Nwabueze
Post-Graduate – English and Literary Studies – University of Nigeria, Nsukka

Abstract

Pop music has become a platform where discourses of gender are analyzed and challenged. Ariana Grande’s “God Is a Woman” joins the ongoing conversation to challenge the status quo by creating a narrative that showcases the supremacy and importance of the woman in the society. However, this narrative has been in place in the pre-colonial Igbo society where the woman occupies significant positions and status in the society. This society recognizes the supremacy of the woman and an appropriate reverence is given to her. This study suggests that the concept behind the song and its video is in close resemblance with the way the precolonial Igbo society views women by examining the status of women in the society represented in Things Fall Apart. Even though the novel shows strains of the patriarchal society, it has not failed to showcase the important status of the woman as recognized by the precolonial Igbo society. This paper does so by conducting an interpretive and explicative analysis of the novel and highlighting how it is in tandem with the feminist ideology that is propagated in the music video. This research is an attempt to demonstrate how the feminist agenda propagated in “God Is a Woman” resonates with the important roles of women in Things Fall Apart both socio-politically, religiously and economically.

Keywords: Womanhood, Precolonial Igbo society, Pop Music, Feminism, Womanism

Nwabueze, Chidimma. “Pop Music, Literature and Gender: Perceptions of Womanhood in Grande’s ‘God Is a Woman’ and Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 23. Crossref. Web.

Fragmented Self: Hawthorne’s Prescient Eye in “The Prophetic Pictures” and “Wakefield”

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.34-40

Naruhiko Mikado

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 34-40

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.34-40

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 34-40

Fragmented Self: Hawthorne’s Prescient Eye in “The Prophetic Pictures” and “Wakefield”

Naruhiko Mikado
Associate, Editorial Board of Osaka Literary Review, Osaka University, Suita, Japan
Email Id: track.and.basketball@gmail.com

Abstract

This brief essay intends to shed a fresh light on two short stories written by the celebrated American author Nathaniel Hawthorne from the perspective of how the ‘self’ is explored; the works to be discussed are “The Prophetic Pictures” and “Wakefield”. Concretely, it will demonstrate that the author presents a characteristic individual whose self is fragmented in each of the two tales. In other words, those characters are separated not only from a common community to which they should ordinarily belong but also from themselves—namely, they are fissured inside themselves. The process of the argument would go as follows: first, it will explain in what way the self of the characters is impaired, then analyze the characteristics, and, in closing, theorize that Hawthorne urges us to review our naïve conception of the self and to introspect ourselves from another outlook. Put differently, he, by shaking our common notion of the self, goads us to make a brief halt and be self-reflective in this bustling world where people often lose themselves.

Keywords: American Literature, Hawthorne, “The Prophetic Pictures”, “Wakefield”, self

Mikado, Naruhiko. “Fragmented Self: Hawthorne’s Prescient Eye in ‘The Prophetic Pictures’ and ‘Wakefield.’” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 34. Crossref. Web.

Such a Long Journey: A tale of the Indian Parsis and Indian Politics

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.41-46

Ipsita Seth Biswas

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 41-46

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.41-46

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 41-46

Such a Long Journey: A tale of the Indian Parsis and Indian Politics

Ipsita Seth Biswas
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research,
Amity University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
Mail Id: ipsita_seth14@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

This paper presents two prominent themes of the novel Such a Long Journey. Parsis in India are a demographically and socially declining community. They once enjoyed a higher social status, however, with passing time they are reduced to second class citizens. This fact remains a major dissatisfaction for them. They, at the same time, take immense pride in their cultural identity. The various rituals related to their day to day chores and even during death are very different from the others’. This gives them a separate ethnic identity, which they cherish. A depiction of the lives, customs and displeasure of the Parsis living in India is highlighted in this write up. Politics too remains another noteworthy theme which is discussed here. The political setback centrally and locally, as perceived by the common mass, has a direct impact on their wellbeing. The scheming government at the center shudders the lives of the protagonist and his close ones. At the same time its incapability to handle situations of war or performing the duties towards the citizens, leave them in contempt. The inertness of the municipality too in doing its important duties leave the residents disgusted. Both these masterfully intertwined themes are studied in this research paper.

Keywords: Parsi, Parsi Community, Indian politics

Biswas, Ipsita Seth. “Such a Long Journey: A Tale of the Indian Parsis and Indian Politics.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 41. Crossref. Web.

The use of images and symbols in Satyajit Ray’s ‘Gupi Gain Bagha Bain’: A comprehensive study

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.47-61

Rajib Nandy

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 47-61
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.47-61

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 47-61
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are availiable in English and Bengali)

The use of images and symbols in Satyajit Ray’s ‘Gupi Gain Bagha Bain’: A comprehensive study

Rajib Nandy
Assistant Professor
Department of Communication and Journalism
University of Chittagong, Bangladesh
Mail Id: rajibndy@gmail.com

Abstract
Film is a powerful medium that plays an important role in establishing communication and providing entertainment. Satyajit Ray is one of the directors of Bengali films. The movie ‘Gupi Gain Bagha Bain’ is an outstanding creation of the time-honored Bengali film director Satyajit Ray. Made in 1969, the film revolves around the simplicity of human behavior, love of nature, war strategy, politics, music, etc. The film revolves around two male characters – Gupi-Bagha. Both of them are passionate and addicted to music and music, but have been dismissed as inexperienced. This movie is the story of the world victory of two outcast characters. This article attempts to explain / analyze the symbols used in the movie in the light of film studies. According to modern archaeologists, we are actually living in a sign world, where each of the symbols has a message.

Keywords: Symbolism, Imagism, Film-Study, Film theory, Language

Nandy, Rajib. “The Use of Images and Symbols in Satyajit Ray’s ‘Gupi Gain Bagha Bain’: A Comprehensive Study.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 47. Crossref. Web.

‘Meghnadabadh Kavya’ in the light of Feminist thought

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.62-69

Biswanath Kuiry

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 62-69
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.62-69

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 62-69
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

‘Meghnadabadh Kavya’ in the light of Feminist thought

Biswanath Kuiry
Lecturer
Department of Bengali
Nistarini Women’s College, Purulia, West Bengal, India
Mail Id: biswanath8145@gmail.com

Abstract

Institutionally, Feminism dates back to the 1960s. Feminism or anthropology, first in the United States, then in various countries in Asia, including Europe and India, gradually went beyond the realm of practice and formed institutional circles. But the woman has been holding the rope of the society forever since that time by making her own identity secondary! The question is where is the relevance of Meghnadabadhakavya, written almost a century ago? In fact, feminism is a structure whose theoretical expression came in the 1980s. But in the addition of salt and oil to the to one’s own labour before the evening lamp is lit, it is relevant in the millennial brick addition phase of the theory building called feminism. The given narrative takes an insightful journey into the realms of a Feminist reading of Meghnadabadhakavya by interpreting relevant social documents and literary changes that accompanied the writing of the text.

Keywords: Meghnadabadhakavya, Feminism, Feminist Literature, Mythology, Folktales

Kuiry, Biswanath. “‘Meghnadabadh Kavya’ in the Light of Feminist Thought.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 62. Crossref. Web.

One Hundred Years of Solitude: Reading Magic Realism and Alienation in their different aspects

DOI: http://10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.70-77

Samaresh Mondal

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 70-77
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: http://10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.70-77

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 70-77
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation /
details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

One Hundred Years of Solitude: Reading Magic Realism and Alienation in their
different aspects

Samaresh Mondal
Doctoral Research Scholar
Indian Comparative Literature Department, Assam University (Central)
Mail i.d.-mondalsamaresh199@gmail.com

Abstract
Latin American Nobel laureate novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s groundbreaking
novel One Hundred Years of Solitude was published in 1986. The reason for choosing
this novel is that it is hugely popular and admired not only in Latin America but in
the whole world literature. The novel changes the author’s life and draws the
world’s attention to Latin American literary lessons. In fact, Marquez spent much of
his childhood and adolescence in the village of Arakataka. In that village full of
poverty, various superstitions he weaves this story of magic and realism. Happiness
and sorrow in his daily life is a world surrounded by wonder, a world that is in front of
everyone but it does not catch everyone’s eye – it flies away in the blink of an eye.
The story of Makondo village was later created by accumulating these various
experiences. This paper discusses alienation and Postmodern thinking, clubbing it
with Magic Realism.

Keyword: Magic Realism, One Hundred Years of Solitude, Postmodern Novel,
Postmodernism, Comparative Literature

Kuiry, Biswanath. “‘Meghnadabadh Kavya’ in the Light of Feminist Thought.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 62. Crossref. Web.

An interview with poet Prabal Kumar Basu

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.78-88
Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 78-88
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.1.2019.78-88

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 78-88
(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are availiable in English and Bengali)

An interview with poet Prabal Kumar Basu
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata
West Bengal, India.
Mail Id: schakraborty3@kol.amity.edu

Abstract

This is an interview with poet Prabal Kumr Basu who is a modern poet, having eighteen poetry books to his credit. He has carved out a definite name in the field of modern Bengali poetry and also has a book of verse drama to his credit. He has received notable accolades and prizes as part of his writing experience, and in this interview, he talks about his childhood, the most important and influential poets whose poetic imprints have inspired him. Moreover, he talks about world poetry as a part of this interview and also carries a very detailed analysis of the present condition of translation studies in the world. The interviewer also asks him as a part of his world tours for official work and also for poetry sessions. He recollects all the moments of poetic enrichment that have helped him in becoming a creatively affluent individual, and a worshipper of poetry.

Poet Prabal kumar Basu was born on 21st September, 1960, in Kolkata, the erstwhile Calcutta. His first poem was published in Samayanug Patrika. His first poetry reading session was in Baker Hall in Presidency College, Calcutta. It was one of the biggest poetry festivals organized by Prabaha in Calcutta then. His first poetry book was Tumii Pratham. He has edited a book Signposts Bengali Poetry since Independence. In 2003 he formed Calcutta International Foundation for Art, Literature and Culture which consisted of famous artists, theatre personalities, poets and other culturally-enriched individuals from all walks of life. In 2004, on the eve of 50th year celebration of Sahitya Akademi, Basu was invited to Bombay for All India Poetry Festival, where he participated in reading sessions. He co-edited a volume of Krittibas that was especially dedicated to write-ups by notable artists. In 2005, Basu received much fame and accolades, along with the West Bengal Bangla Akademy Puraskar, for his poetry book Jamon kore gaichhe Akash. In this same year he was invited to the Third International Poetry Festival in Wellington, New Zealand. Mail Id: prabalkumar@gmail.com

Keyword: Interview, Poetry, Translation, Bookfair, Little Magazine

Note: This is an interview conducted in Bengali and there is no citation or works cited required. It is a live interview taken by Sreetanwi Chakraborty, Chief-Editor of Litinfinite Journal.

Chakraborty, Sreetanwi. “An Interview with Poet Prabal Kumar Basu.” Litinfinite Journal 1.1 (2019): 78. Crossref. Web.

General Section

Cloudy Monsoon (Poetry)

Mahfuz Al-Hossain

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 89

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 89 (Poetry Section)

Cloudy Monsoon

Mahfuz Al-Hossain
Registrar, National University of Bangladesh, Dhaka
Mail Id: mahfuzalhossain.bd2018@gmail.com

Abstract
In the given poem the poet from Bangladesh brings around a fine blend of modernism and postmodern conflict. On the one hand, we find a sheer sense of sentimentality on being isolated, as the days flicker and pass by, and on the other hand, there is a reverberation of true love even amidst a most dismal form of living. The poet experiments with form, structure and nuanced pattern of syllables that are extremely important for anyone to submerge his or her self into the profound realms of poetry. He talks about daily, routine, mundane images and the essence of cloudy monsoon –the magical silhouette that is created through poetry.

Keyword: Love Poetry, Modernist Poetry, Modernism, Poetic Symbols, Symbolism

Mahfuz Al-Hossain. (2019). Cloudy Monsoon. Litinfinite journal, 1(1), 89. 

Ajeya -The Invincible (Poetry)

Dr. Pranabes Bhattacharyya

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 90
(This poem is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019 | Page: 90
(This poem is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Ajeya (The Invincible)

Dr. Pranabes Bhattacharyya
Assistant Professor,
Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam Government College, New Town
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail Id: pranabes.bhattacharyya@gmail.com

Abstract
In the given poem the poet makes a distinct clarion call about the abstract idea of invincibility. Whether it is about any personal ideal of the loss of identity in a heterogeneous society, there is always a chance for the rectification of wrongs and standing out amidst all. It is an indictment of lethargy, calling out to people to come out of their sluggish modern lives and the final lines question the entire concept of history and epitaph. The poet wishes that history and the activities of mankind shall live on generation after generation.

Keyword: Love Poetry, Modernist Poetry, Modernism, Poetic Symbols, Symbolism

Dr. Pranabes Bhattacharyya. (2019). Ajeya (The Invincible). Litinfinite journal, 1(1), 90.

A Love Soaked Science Fiction

Dr. Shiv Sethi

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-1 | July, 2019| Book Review| Page: 91-93

Litinfinite Journal does not provide / assign any DOI for General Section. 

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