Cover Design by Supriyo Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal 

Vol-2, Issue-2 | December, 2020

Folklore, Myths and Indigenous Studies

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | December, 2020

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | December, 2020

Sl No

Title

Section

Page

1

Editorial

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editorial

i-iii

2

Masked Women and Myths in “The Thousand Faces of Night”

Dr. Chandramani

Article

1-10

3

Femininity in Tantric Buddhism: A Study of Sanmatrananda’s Nastik Panditer Bhita

Dr. Surapriya Chakraborty

Article

11-20

4

Making Sense: Re-imagining Morung Culture and Translation of Ao-Naga Folksongs

Dr. Imchasenla

Article

21-35

5

Rites of Passage: Special Reference to Ao-Naga Puberty Rites as Markers of Identity

Dr. Resenmenla Longchar

Article

36-49

6

Our Moon has Blood Clots and the Poetics of Indigenous Representation: Kashmiri Pandit Narratives as Indigenous Literature

Soumyadeep Neogi

Article

50-63

7

Animating Folktales: An Analysis of Animation Movies based on Folktales of three different Indian Languages

Maya Bhowmick &  Dr. Ankuran Dutta

Article

64-75

8

Integrative Dialogue among Oral Genres Using the Example of Beninese Fairy Tales and Riddles

Sewanou Lanmadousselo

Article

76-87

9

Indian Literature: The Polyphonic Nature of Deconstructing Myths

Samaresh Mondal

Article

88-107

10

Toward a Dramatic World: The Latest Resurgence of Drama and Speculative Materialism

Naruhiko Mikado

Article

108-112

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief-Editor- Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

Editorial
Prof. Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Editor – in – Chief
Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata, WB, India

It gives me great pleasure to bring out the December issue of Litinfinite, concentrating upon folk studies as a multidisciplinary initiative. If we scrutinize the historical background, we found how the term folklore as a careful combination of folk and lore was coined in the year 1846 by an Englishman called William Thoms. As a part of any cultural discourse, folk studies can be considered as an integral part of communication and in underlining the well-integrated pattern of any community as such. Folklorists always claim a wider disciplinary aspect with the help of history, linguistics, literary productions of an age, economics, artistic and communicative approaches to highlight the main constituents of folklore. Through inventions, collections, documentations and combined knowledge, the work of the folklorists always give birth to some or the other form of contested space: these can be traditional, modern, popular, mainstream and academic and of different other varieties in nature.

 

Dr. Chandramani discusses how this folkloric structure, myths, the usage of different paradigmatic shifts in the form of cultural and Feminist studies can be included in re-reading GithaHariharan’sThe Thousand Faces of Night. The study of Indian mythology, storytelling as a cathartic process and the entire narrative of women’s studies interwoven with the societal and familial repercussion that a reliance on myths can have. Dr. Surapriya Chakraborty’s folk angle is slightly different, verging on the study of Femininity in Tantric Buddhism, taking a magnanimous work like NastikPanditerBhita and discussing the psycho-sexual, social, mythic and religious dimensions that the thought-provoking realms of the novel proposes to investigate. She highlights the several elements present in some of the American Feminist schools, and some of the Buddhist and the Oriental mystic conceptualization of Femininity in occupying and reinstating power, balance and newer forms of esoteric practices.

Folk culture itself is densely multilayered. With the cultural developments, additions and the vantage point that critics create, the area of folk studies has increased manifold in the past few decades. Dr. Imchasenla’s paper on Re-imagining the Morung culture and translation of the Ao-Naga folksongs is an innovative study on how these varied cultural parameters are responsible for sustaining the vitality of any culture, across time. The oldest and the strongest controlling doctrines that are part of the Morung culture and cementing community development through songs and other cultural narratives illumine an alternative non-Western discourse on studying indigeneity and nativity. Dr. ResenmenlaLongchar, on the other hand, discusses the various aspects of the Ao-Naga culture, with special reference to their puberty rites. The finer and subtle passages of transition from boyhood/girlhood to youth and the induction as part of the Ao-Naga culture are well-depicted by the researcher. Beliefs, rituals, tales, tattoos, marriage, cultural communication, all are invited on a common platform for diverse social, cultural, political and cross-disciplinary criticisms, to enhance the knowledge about the cumulative identity of a community.

In folk literature, cultural studies, folk theatres, performance and lores, we find often dissident voices that contest for recognition. There are tensions created as per ethnology, geo-political circumventions, expressions and specific attitudes from communities across cultures. There are different portions of the same work, or in other cases, significant binaries existing as part of a single work that is published within the variations of a time. How do we study oral literature in terms of the immediate social context? Where do we find the nature of hybridization existing? How does the compass of folk culture and interdisciplinary study regulate community behavior, or does it endanger any social community to a large extent? As folklorists, as researchers dealing with multidisciplinary studies, then how do we place the fantastic elements, recurring features, archetypes and the study of folk culture from an inherently historical perspective? Are myths and folktales related somewhere? All these and many other questions do arise when we study the concept of folk and indigeneity from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The paper by SoumyadeepNeogi is a fine tapestry in understanding the Kashmiri Pandit narratives in Rahul Pandita’s workOur Moon has Blood Clots:  Memoir of a Lost Home in Kashmir. Neogi has tried to unearth the poetics of indigenous representation through this memoir. Exile, rootlessness, homeland, indigenous identity and the functioning of hegemony, power-play and distinct cultural groups in forming identity and socio-political discourse. Studying indigeneity and through some common concerns like ‘political neglect, economic marginalization and social vulnerability with regards to the protection of their cultural rights’, as Neogi mentions in his paper, find out a distinct voice of the Pandit narratives through the text. The location of the Kashmiri Pandits as the significant ‘other’, the more marginalized segment of a dominant Muslim culture in Kashmir, thus finds a suitable voice through Neogi’s research-oriented lens.

There are several segments and voices of dissent and experimentation that also arise while we study nativity, folk and cultural performativity across a given time. Language plays a special role in that, and in their paper titled Animating Folktales: An Analysis of Animation movies based on folk tales of three different languages, the authors Maya Bhowmick and Dr. Ankuran Dutta  have enlarged the resources on how to study multiple layers of culture through storytelling modes, manners and mechanisms. Bengali, Assamese, Hindi, these three languages and popular folktales disseminated through these reflect the glorious integrity of semantics, culture, social equations and even community approach toward customs and vulnerability. Oral and visual performances, voicing opinions and regionalized mechanisms in re-reading folktales-this is what the paper tries to communicate as some of the broader aspects.

It should be noteworthy how fairy tales and riddles have always played a vital role in attenuating the different dimensions of a certain culture, across borders. A specific cultural production and inheritance over a passage of time requires diverse investigations, social and literary researches and reviews and integration of dialogues across spaces. SewanouLanmadousselo interrogates these varied ideas that are deeply embedded into the reconstruction and structuring of myths, folktales, lores and community connectivity in Beninese Fairy Tales and Riddles. Orders, solutions, learning capability, reasoning and heterogeneity, this is what takes the best solution in understanding the work of Lanmadousselo. This is the constant deconstruction of myths, a method to understand polyphony in Indian literature, that finds an appropriate voice in Samaresh Mondal’s paper titled Indian Literature: The Polyphonic Nature of Deconstructing Myths. A comparative analysis of folk tales and mythical constituents that are well-integrated in works of Eliot, in Tarashankar Bandyopadhyay who writes about rustic myths and multilayered collectives in his novel, form the area of Mondal’s study. And finally, we have a special contribution by Naruhiko Mikado in understanding drama in terms of speculative materialism.

With an urgency toward reinstating specific community and cultural development across borders and nations, we thus present a volume on folk studies as a multidisciplinary exercise. Navigating through the primitive discourses on folk literature and performance and highlighting the current, the more recent and contemporary ones, we have tried to present research papers that provide multifaceted contextual paradigms in advanced research.

Extending my heartfelt thanks to all our respected advisors and editors, for their support and constant encouragement.

I express my gratitude, warmth and thanks to our publisher Mr. Supriyo Chakraborty and Penprints Publication for their unflinching support in this academic endeavour.

Wishing a great year ahead to all our readers.

Thank you!

Masked Women and Myths in “The Thousand Faces of Night

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.1-10

Dr. Chandramani

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 1-10

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.1-10

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 1-10

Masked Women and Myths in “The Thousand Faces of Night

Dr. Chandramani
Assistant Professor (English), Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Odisha. India.
Mail Id: chandramani_hum@vssut.ac.in | Orcid ID: 0000-0001-8619-6750

Abstract

The term ‘Myth’ has a series of controversies associated with its meaning and interpretation. Myth is believed to be an intellectual creation of ancient man. They are culture specific ideas, beliefs, narratives etc. which are created to enlighten humans of morality, ethics, responsibility, obligations etc. The main focus of the paper would be to employ mythology from feministic perspective. Githa Hariharan’s The Thousand Faces of Night highlights the domination and subjugation of women (i.e. victimhood) in male-centered set-up. The writer opts for mythological stories (Mahabharata and Folktales) as patriarchal discourse to lend voice to the silenced females. It is interesting to note that even in mythological works women are illustrated as subjects/objects of sheer violence. Hariharan claims that woman characters like Mayamma and Devi silently accept all the discrimination, suppression, and protest assertively against the forces of patriarchy are representative of transitional women. More significantly, Hariharan urges for a progressive society where women can exercise their personal space. Through a careful depiction of various myths and folktales, Hariharan wants to project the self-realization and psychological consciousness.

Keywords: Myths, Folklore, Feminist, Patriarchal, Oppression

Chandramani. “Masked Women and Myths in ‘The Thousand Faces of Night.’” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 1–10. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.1-10.

Femininity in Tantric Buddhism: A Study of Sanmatrananda’s Nastik Panditer Bhita

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.11-20

Dr. Surapriya Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 11-20

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.11-20

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 11-20

Femininity in Tantric Buddhism: A Study of Sanmatrananda’s Nastik Panditer Bhita

Dr. Surapriya Chakraborty
Independent Researcher, Doctorate in History, Jadavpur University, West Bengal, India.
Mail Id: saptaparna.chakrovorti@gmail.com | Orcid ID: 0000-0003-1256-8843

Abstract

Femininity is a part and parcel of various religious practices since time immemorial. Tantric Buddhism is one such religion that gives equal importance to its male and female practitioners. The honour and respect that women enjoyed in this religious sphere has been reflected in the content of the Bengali novel NastikPanditerBhita (2017) by Sanmatrananda. Apparently speaking, the book deals with the life of Atisa Dipankara , an eminent Buddhist scholar of eleventh century . In reality, this piece of indigenous literature sings the glory of female divinity in Tantric Buddhism. This book also celebrates the multifaceted role of a woman as a daughter, lover as well as a mother. The pivotal role of a woman as a mentor is also a part of this writing. This paper will try to dissect the novel historically. It will try to make an effort to discover the feminine essence of Tantric Buddhism. The paper will also find out the glory enjoyed by the female deities and the role of women in Tantric Buddhism. The study will be made from both historical and socio-religious points of views. This study is significant and relevant in today’s context to express a woman’s potentiality to shape a society and to make it free from all promiscuities.

Keywords: Divinity, Femininity, Socio-Religious, Mentor, Esoteric Practices

Chakraborty, Surapriya. “Femininity in Tantric Buddhism: A Study of Sanmatrananda’s Nastik Panditer Bhita.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 11–20. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.11-20.

Making Sense: Re-imagining MorungCulture and Translation of Ao-Naga Folksongs

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.21-35

Dr. Imchasenla

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 21-35

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.21-35

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 21-35

Making Sense: Re-imagining MorungCulture and Translation of Ao-Naga Folksongs

Dr. Imchasenla
ICSSR-Post Doctoral Fellow, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 046. India.
Mail Id: imchasen@gmail.com


Abstract

Various factors represented by theinvasion of the British, the influence of American Missionaries, and
the liberal education of the Western model have adversely impacted the corpus of the Nagas’ rich
customs, beliefs, practices, institutions and oral traditions. One such occurrence is the disintegration of
the Morung, aunique traditional institution of learning that served as the important foundation of the
Naga society.Hence, an attempt to re-imagine or re-write the culture of the Morung, which was hijacked
by the Colonial power, becomes crucial to critique the colonial anthropological translation and provide a
different reading drawing lessons from the translation ofAo-Naga folksongs.Here, the folksongs are
translated to analyse the Ao-Naga folksongs, trace the historical trajectory and understand the nuances
of the songs.It is an attempt to recapture the social-cultural values,history, polity, philosophy, religion
and other practices pertaining to this traditional institution. The paper delves into the past lived
experience and realities of the Morung Culture and present for the receiving audience the uniqueness
and the significance of the institution of the Ao-Naga community, its world and the worldview.

Keywords: Oral traditions, Folksongs, Translation, Morung, Ao-Nagas

Imchasenla. “Making Sense:Re-ImaginingMorungCulture AndTranslation of Ao-Naga Folksongs.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 21–35. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.21-35.

Rites of Passage: Special Reference to Ao-Naga Puberty Rites as Markers of Identity

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.36-49

Dr. Resenmenla Longchar

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 36-49

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.36-49

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 36-49

Rites of Passage: Special Reference to Ao-Naga Puberty Rites as Markers of Identity

Dr. Resenmenla Longchar
Assistant Professor, Department of History, ICFAI University, Nagaland.
Mail Id: resenmenlalongchar@iunagaland.edu.in


Abstract

Like in any other human society, in traditional Ao-Naga life, puberty is an important phase to be celebrated it as a rite. Ao-Nagas visualize puberty as an indicator to get married and ability to beget children through legitimate marriage. The celebration of puberty rites of the girls differ from person to person depending upon their respective physical appearances. The Ao-Naga society validates maturity more as a cultural construct than exclusively as a biological indicator. The process in Ao-Naga puberty rite includes several aspects to delineate the transit of the girl/boy from childhood to youth. Each aspect is unique and determines the identities of the individuals in their new thresholds as well as a member of the community. The process in Ao-Naga puberty rite includes several aspects to delineate the transit of the girl/boy from childhood to youth. Each aspect is unique and determines the identities of the individuals in their new thresholds as well as a member of the community. So this paper attempts to study the process of the puberty rites of the Ao-Naga boys and girls separately. And also, Van Gennep’s theoretical approach to ‘rites of passage’ is applied in my case study to analyze how Ao-Nagas construct their own self and also as a member of the community.

Keywords: Puberty, Rites of Passage, Identity, Threshold

Longchar, Resenmenla. “Rites of Passage: Special Reference to Ao-Naga Puberty Rites as Markers of Identity.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 36–49. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.36-49.

Our Moon has Blood Clots and the Poetics of Indigenous Representation: Kashmiri Pandit Narratives as Indigenous Literature

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.50-63

Soumyadeep Neogi

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 50-63

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.50-63

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 50-63

Our Moon has Blood Clots and the Poetics of Indigenous Representation: Kashmiri Pandit Narratives as Indigenous Literature

Soumyadeep Neogi
Senior Research Fellow, Department of English, University of Delhi, India.
Mail Id: soumyadeepneogi89@gmail.com | Orcid ID: 0000-0001-8634-2244

Abstract

As the literature of marginalized communities, Indigenous Literature contests mainstream discourses through self-representation and depictions of critical indigenous issues. No matter where it is produced, Indigenous Literature is connected by certain universal characteristics and thematic similarities that display indigenous people’s resistance to socio-cultural hegemony. Thus, it is a literary response to contexts of oppression and discrimination and engenders a collective legacy of social suffering by expressing historically suppressed truths. It disputes political dominance with themes that articulate the indigenous fight for personal, social, political and cultural identity. The relationship between people and place, and the experience of losing one’s homeland and severing ties from one’s traditions is a crucial part of Indigenous Literature. Kashmiri Pandits are not generally considered an ‘indigenous community,’ but recent Pandit narratives reflect similar concerns regarding their experiences of facing targeted violence, losing their homeland and being forced into exile after the insurgency started in Kashmir. This paper seeks to situate Pandits as an indigenous community, and by analysing Rahul Pandita’s representation of the Pandit experience in Our Moon has Blood Clots, the paper extends the scope of Indigenous Literature in contemporary Indian English Literature to include recent Anglophone Kashmiri Pandit narratives.

Keywords: Indigenous Literature, Autochthony, Kashmiri Pandit, Kashmir Conflict, Indian English Literature

Neogi, Soumyadeep. “Our Moon Has Blood Clots and the Poetics of Indigenous Representation: Kashmiri Pandit Narratives as Indigenous Literature.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 50–63. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.50-63.

Animating Folktales: An Analysis of Animation Movies based on Folktales of three different Indian Languages

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.64-75

Maya Bhowmick
Dr. Ankuran Dutta

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 64-75

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.64-75

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 64-75

Animating Folktales: An Analysis of Animation Movies based on Folktales of three different Indian Languages

Maya Bhowmick
Student, Department of Communication and Journalism, Gauhati University, Guwahati, India.
Mail Id: mayab.bhowmick@gmail.com

Ankuran Dutta
Associate Professor and Head, Department of Communication and Journalism, Gauhati University, Guwahati, India.
Mail Id: adutta@gauhati.ac.in | Orchid ID: 0000-0002-0637-9846


Abstract

Folktales are the oldest and traditional means of communication having remained a powerful means of communication over the years. Since its inception this method of storytelling and communicating has changed its medium of transmission but not its manner of storytelling. For ages, oral tradition has been a medium of transmission of these stories and culture but with modernization, the medium changed to print, electronic, and now digital media. These folktales do not represent mere stories; but communicate the varied culture, tradition, rituals, history and much other vital information reflecting the timeline of various communities. Serving as an active agent of both information and entertainment at the community level for so many years today, there arises an immediate need to preserve this form of storytelling – Folktales, especially in the context of its presentation has witnessed a change in recent times. Animation being the latest medium of entertainment, folktales can also be narrated in the form of animation that will also help preserve the stories in animated form for future generations. By doing so, folktales can be pushed beyond the boundaries of the community level and can be prevailed in the global platform to benefit the entire human race. Several communities across the globe have converted their folktales into animated movies to acquire the wider reach of audiences globally. This also helps to popularize the old traditions of these communities so that the newer generations can understand its significance in the present-day context of digital platforms. Moreover, extinguishing the line of the geographical divide, it ties people living across the world together through its common thread of lesson learning folktales.

Keywords: Folktales, Animation Movies, Animated Folktales, Hindi, Bengali, Assamese, Digital Media, YouTube

Bhowmick, Maya. “Animating Folktales: An Analysis of Animation Movies Based on Folktales of Three Different Indian Languages.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 64–75. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.64-75.

Integrative Dialogue among Oral Genres Using the Example of Beninese Fairy Tales and Riddles

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.76-87

Sewanou Lanmadousselo

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 76-87

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.76-87

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 76-87

Integrative Dialogue among Oral Genres Using the Example of Beninese Fairy Tales and Riddles

Sewanou Lanmadousselo
Doctoral student – Comparative Literature (German and African), Ecocriticism – University of Kassel, Germany.
Mail Id: jupitomartio@yahoo.fr

Abstract

The term “Räthsel-Märchen” (Eng.: “Riddle fairy tale”) was first used by the Brothers Grimm in the first edition of “Kinder- und Hausmärchen” (Eng.: “Children’s and Household Tales”). With it, they titled the fairy tale 69, which was published in the later editions, namely, in the ones of 1837 and 1840 under the title Rätsel (Eng.: “riddle”). After them, riddles collectors and researchers used this term in their respective works to designate a category of riddles and fairy tales. This article focusses on the latter, using the Beninese fairy tales, especially those of the Fon, as a starting point to show how, through its narrative function in the fairy tale, the riddle contributes to an integrative dialogue between the two oral genres.

Keywords: Fon Fairy Tales, Riddle, Riddle Tales, Narrative Function, Integrative Dialogue

Lanmadousselo, Sewanou. “Integrative Dialogue among Oral Genres Using the Example of Beninese Fairy Tales and Riddles.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 76–87. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.76-87.

Indian Literature: The Polyphonic Nature of Deconstructing Myths (ভারতীয় সাহিত্য: মিথ, ঘাত-প্রতিঘাতের বিনির্মাণের বহুস্বর)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.88-107

Samaresh Mondal

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 88-107

(This paper is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.88-107

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 88-107

Indian Literature: The Polyphonic Nature of Deconstructing Myths (ভারতীয় সাহিত্য: মিথ, ঘাত-প্রতিঘাতের বিনির্মাণের বহুস্বর)

Samaresh Mondal
Ph.D Fellow, Indian Comparative literature Department, Assam University (Central), Silchar, India.
Mail Id: mondalsamaresh199@gmail.com | Orcid ID: 0000-0003-4846-4579

Abstract

In this modernized world, scientific invention may breathe life into poetry and poetry, along with myth will recreate and redefine literature. Like the way, we collect myths; we create and intrude into myths as well. Language and the world consist of myths and finally it gives birth to life.

Etymologically myth came from the Greek word ‘muthos’ which was later adopted by Latin. Though nowadays the word may signify something else, originally it used to refer to the combination of poetry and music.

If we consider myth to be an amalgamation of poetry and music, we can easily state that myth is an imaginative creation of an entire community. This creation is also a process of knowledge production which is explained through the various sensuous colours and forms of different experiences one gathers in one’s life. In this process, language as well as the colours and forms change simultaneously and with them, the experiences are re-explained. Thus, the function of myth is to turn experience into knowledge and knowledge into colours and forms. The poet uses myth to achieve a universal truth, which is a general purpose of using myth in any form of verbal arts. Because, it is myth through which the deeper truth can express itself easily and it can expand the horizon beyond the day-to-day notion of beauty. The noted journalist and author, Italo Calvino from Italy opined, Myth is the hidden part of every story, the buried part the region that is still unexplored because there are as yet no words to enable us to get them. Myth is nourished silence as well as by words.

The novel Hanshuli Banker Upakathaby Tara Shankar Bandyopadhyay, which is centred on Indian freedom movement, starts with a particular myth of a whistling sound of semi-divine origin that comes from the forest at night and frightens the kahars. The use of myth along with modernity makes the novel truly polyphonic. The author portrayed the ups and downs of the residents of an insignificant and remote village called ‘banshbadi’, whose lives revolved around the river kopai. He described how the local beliefs, local myths and folklores were gradually changing and giving way to the modern lores and tales and creating a space for heteroglossia and polyphony. In this context, I have cited few indigenous and foreign authors, not only to strengthen my points, but also to show how myth crosses the spatio-temporal boundaries.


Keywords: Folklore, Myth, Deconstruction, Imagination, Tradition, Modernity, Voices

Mondal, Samaresh. “Indian Literature: The Polyphonic Nature of Deconstructing Myths.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 88–107. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.88-107.

Toward a Dramatic World: The Latest Resurgence of Drama and Speculative Materialism

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.108-112

Naruhiko Mikado

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 108-112

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.108-112

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-2 | Dec, 2020 | Page: 108-112

Toward a Dramatic World: The Latest Resurgence of Drama and Speculative Materialism

Naruhiko Mikado
Associate, Editorial Board of Osaka Literary Review, Osaka University, Suita, Japan.
Mail Id: track.and.basketball@gmail.com

Abstract

This essay has two aims: it tries, first, to demonstrate that there is an unignorable correlative relationship between the current resurgence in the popularity of stage plays and the meteoric rise of Speculative Materialism, a philosophical school led by Quentin Meillassoux, and, second, to elicit a useful insight for contemporary people who live in an era when the postmodern relativism has run into a snag. Concretely, the first part shows that any drama enjoins its audience to assent to the ‘dramatic premise’, which is a set of implicit presuppositions. The second part analyzes the fundamental tenets of Speculative Materialism, and points out that there is a curious similitude between the ‘dramatic premise’ and the perspective which the new philosophy urges us to adopt. The last part concludes the discussion by proposing a possible worldview that can be drawn from the investigation into the similarity between the outwardly irrelevant items.


Keywords: Drama, Philosophy, Speculative Materialism, Interdisciplinary Studies

Mikado, Naruhiko. “Toward a Dramatic World: The Latest Resurgence of Drama and Speculative Materialism.” Litinfinite Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, 2020, pp. 108–12. Crossref, doi:10.47365/litinfinite.2.2.2020.108-112.

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