Litinfinite Journal | ISSN: 2582-0400 [Online]

LITINFINITE JOURNAL
ISSN: 2582-0400 [Online]
CODEN: LITIBR

Peer-reviewed Journal of Literature and Social Sciences  

Open Access Journal

Litinfinite Journal is indexed by MLA Directory Of Periodicals & MLA International Bibliography, DOAJ, EBSCO, ProQuest, SCILIT, Ulrichsweb & Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, ICI World Of Journals, J-Gate, JISC, ERIH PLUS & other major indexing services 

'The Prince of Darkness is a Gentleman' - King Lear | Cover Model: Scott Thomas Outlar, Photographer: Mechelle Wilson Ballew©

Litinfinite Journal 

Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021

Reading Shakespeare from a Multidisciplinary Approach

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021

Sl NoTitleSectionPage
1

Editorial

 

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editoriali-iv
2

Re-imagining Shakespeare as our Contemporary- Alternate Interpretations of Hamlet in the theatrical space: Traversing from Local to Global and vice versa; an attempt at dismantling the canon or perpetuating its transience?

 

Purbali Sengupta

Article1-12
3

Is There an Audience in the Lady’s Bedchamber? Shakespeare’s Dramatic Trope in the Sleep-Walking Scene in Macbeth

 

Manidip Chakraborty

Article13-21
4

The Bifocality of Dance in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: An Analysis of Shakespearean Dance Adaptations

 

Kimberly M. Glassman

Article22-30
5

Contemporising the Topos of Shakespearean Dramas:  A Comparative (Re)Reading of Memory, Masculinity and Vengeance with special reference to William Shakespeare’s Tragedies and History Plays

 

Rahul Kar 1 , Sangeeta Saha2

Article31-38

 

6

 

Biographical Criticism of Shakespeare in Bengal: A Close Study of S.C. Sengupta’s “Shakespeare the Man”

 

Dr. Samik Sen

Article39-48

 

 

7

 

 

Revamping Shakespeare: Filmic Adaptation of Romeo and Juliet into Goliyon ki Rasleela RamLeela

 

Dr. Neenu Kumar

 

 

Article

 

 

49-57

8

Gendered Guise: Shakespeare’s use of Transvestism and Gender Appropriation in his Plays

 

Sanghita Sanyal

Article58-68
9

The Moor of Venice: Critically Analysing Othello Based on Race, Colour, Gender as the Social Constructor, and the Facilitator to Kill Desdemona. 

 

Sneha Chakraborty1, Oly Saha2

Article69-79
10

Rain, Icicle, Heat and Quarantine: Reading Anthropocene: Climate Change, Contagion, Consolation by Sudeep Sen

 

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Article80-86
11

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

 

Heba Rajili

Article87-89

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief-Editor- Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

Editorial
Prof. Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Editor – in – Chief
Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata, WB, India

How to start? Where to start? If we consider the recent comprehensive developments in dissecting the multidisciplinary approaches to reading Shakespeare, we find how the re-telling of his plays recreates and destroys the boundaries of knowing him. If closure in reading is seen as an excuse, then certainly, Shakespeare’s performances are open-ended in all plausible sense of the term. Playing Shakespearean characters and re-inventing them through lights, sounds, costumes, stage productions include a continuous shift from the original themes, styles, and techniques. The ideas related to representation, performance, nativity of the characters, scenes, display elements, succinct layers of meaning-everything undergo a drastic alteration when critical and academic scrutinization of the plays are taken into account. Hamlet on stage, Hamlet in film adaptations, and studying regional versions of Hamlet present insightful articulation of re-locating Shakespeare’s studies from a new angle. In his essay ‘The Play’s not the only Thing’, Antoni Cimolino refutes the idea of an exclusive script of Shakespeare as such. In terms of narrating innovative ideas, (especially when we scan through Shakespeare’s manual) he says that all Shakespeare left was a script:

            “We can imagine the scenes in as much, or as little, detail as we like. And what we mentally see or hear in one scene need not be consistent with what we hear or see in the next. In our mind’s eye, we can envisage both a dashingly Byronic romantic hero and a fat thirty-year-old who still hasn’t finished school. In our mind’s ear, we can hear a whole chorus of the various inflections and emphases that could be given to a single line.” (Cimolino,15)

This is the point where any singularity related to performance gets nullified. Multiple voices that create and protract the binaries in Shakespeare get authenticated through this mental hearing, the mind’s eye that produces either a Byronic romantic hero or a fat thirty-year-old.

Litinfinite Journal Vol. III, Issue- I contains research papers from across the globe, that deconstruct any unidimensional notion of studying Shakespeare. Purbali Sengupta’s paper attempts to re-imagine the bard and to offer a fresh perspective to the theatrical presentation of Hamlet. Traversing from local to global-this remains the thematic idea in her paper, where she talks about the proliferation of Shakespeare studies in the western canon, and how the recent studies and performances dismantle the erstwhile ideas. Manidip Chakraborty’s paper, on the other hand, makes a succinct presentation of locating an ‘audience’ in Lady Macbeth’s bed-chamber: studying the dramatic trope in the sleep-walking scene of Macbeth. The function of the chorus and the play-within-a-play technique all highlight the different angles from which one particular scene needs to be constructed afresh.

Going beyond the trajectory constituted by metaphors of sexual and imperial domination, the new phases of Shakespearean studies concentrate on the anti-patriarchal and anti-colonial tendencies, as Jonathan Gil Harris puts forward in his seminal work Shakespeare and Literary Theory:

            “When we apply theory to Shakespeare’s writing, we are not really exposing it to foreign bodies, whether pathogenic or curative. If theory is a virus that has invaded Shakespeare, its genetic material already contains traces of its host. Theory, then, is not straightforwardly foreign to Shakespeare: it is already Shakespearean.” (Harris, 3)

Theories of decoding, unearthing, and accentuating major streaks of Shakespearean drama are thus, fraught with complications. Everything, right from Formalism to the Feminist theories, from poststructuralist Marxism to the Lacanian goals- there has been no dearth of how these theories embark upon a dialogue-journey with Shakespeare. And the critical discourse keeps on changing through several methodical approaches that scholars and critics have undertaken.

Kimberley M Glassman’s paper, for instance, highlights the bifocality of dance in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. The dance adaptations through ballet-movies, dance as the part of performance, and the contribution of dance to the forms of Shakespearean comedy are well-exemplified in Kimberley’s articulation of research. The acts and performances allow a kind of cultural sympathy between a literary icon that Shakespeare is, and one of the leading institutions like the Royal Ballet. The dance forms do not give rise to abstract pieces, but they are new narratives that have become an intense source of academic discussion and also extend beyond classrooms.

Rahul Kar and Sangeeta Saha’s paper focuses upon how to contemporize the topos of Shakespearean drama. The larger interest area of the paper remains in the re-reading of memory, masculinity, and vengeance with special reference to Shakespeare’s tragedies and history plays. The ideals of valour, encouragement, masculinity and vengeance at a time, bloodshed, and patriotic consciousness all are portrayed in a most succinct manner by the researchers.

Each study of Shakespeare brings something new and fresh to the fore. The studies vary from one geographical location to another. The critical reception of Shakespeare in Bengal is yet another study that has gained much prominence in and beyond academia. Dr. Samik Sen’s paper analyzes the biographical criticism of Shakespeare in Bengal. This he does with a special reference to S.C. Sengupta’s ‘Shakespeare the Man’. The paper emphasizes various ideological ideas that gave birth to the construction of Shakespeare’s criticism in Bengal.

Reading theatre and reading film adaptations are completely different. A closeted knowledge of Shakespearean studies can never do the required justice to his works. Dr. Neenu Kumar’s take on Indian filmic adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays delves into the variable dimensions of society, class representation, and the study of power and resistance as part of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s adaptation of Shakespearean stories into his films. The cultural ethos, representation of the ‘glocal’ and the ‘masala’ ingredients in the Bollywood films have been discussed at large in Dr. Kumar’s research paper.

Shakespearean studies do give rise to variety. Varieties of performance, varieties in decoding the myths of male/ female, black/white, high/low, savage/ civilized, and so on. The regular and more conventional modes of understanding gender binaries, for instance, alter to a large extent when we take recourse to read Transvestism and gender appropriation in his plays. Sanghita Sanyal’s paper addresses exactly these issues pertaining to cross-dressing, social mores active during his time and how women were not allowed to play a distinct role on the stage. The paper also aims to bring around the aftermath of cross-dressing on stage. And finally, we also have an insightful paper of understanding race, class, cultural distinctions, and hierarchy in Othello. Sneha Chakraborty and Oly Saha’s paper aims to examine the themes of ownership, motiveless malignity and honour as reflected in Othello.

For this issue, we have two book reviews. I have dwelt at large on an academic review of internationally-acclaimed poet Sudeep Sen’s artistic journey in his new book, Anthropocene: Climate Change, Contagion, Consolation. The book contains Sen’s pointed and important observations in his typically original, lyrical and tightly-wrought style. Thoughts and ideas about the causality of environmental forces and their effects are turned into the most exquisite, palpable poetry coming out of India — one that is both local and global, national, and international in its outlook. The brink of human existence and the kaleidoscopic vision of human instinct and survival are painted through the changing and astute perceptions of Sen’s artistic lens.

Finally, we have another book review- Heba Rajili has done a review of The Help by Kathryn Stockett.The review highlights racial camps and demarcation for domestic workers, and astutely develops a critical review of white women and black servants. The reviewer has also included a comparative study of the book and the film related to it.

So, here goes Litinfinite Journal Vol. III, Issue I for our readers.

I express my sincerest thanks to all my respected editorial and advisory board members and contributors.

I take this occasion to thank Penprints Publication, for extending their untiring support to the journal.

 

Thanking you,

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editor-in-Chief,

Litinfinite Journal

Kolkata

 

 

References:

Graham, Kenneth. Shakespeare On Stage And Off. Canada: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2019. Print.

Harris, Jonathan Gil. Shakespeare And Literary Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Print.

Re-imagining Shakespeare as our Contemporary- Alternate Interpretations of Hamlet in the theatrical space: Traversing from Local to Global and vice versa; an attempt at dismantling the canon or perpetuating its transience?

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.1-12

Purbali Sengupta

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 1-12

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.1-12

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 1-12

Re-imagining Shakespeare as our Contemporary- Alternate Interpretations of Hamlet in the theatrical space: Traversing from Local to Global and vice versa; an attempt at dismantling the canon or perpetuating its transience?

Purbali Sengupta

Faculty of French, International School of Hospitality Management, Kolkata, India.

Mail Id: purbali4042@gmail.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-7079-9204 

Abstract

The very act of articulating Shakespeare from a space in the Global South can trigger a maelstrom of contesting ideologies. There was always a mad scramble among academics to interpret and own the bard intimately. Undoubtedly, one of the aspects of British colonial rule was to establish its cultural hegemony and ‘Englishness’ in the colonies through a well-designed curriculum. However, the colonial structures of power implicated into institutional fabrics make the task of a post-colonial scholar challenging the colonial ideology, quite complex. William Shakespeare, has (often anachronistically), traversed through myriad trajectories of different cultures/ages, becoming through his works, a site of cultural contestation. Hamlet, the eponymous protagonist of the tragedy ‘Hamlet’, was almost the tragedian’s doppelganger, created at a critical juncture in his personal life. This paper looks at the diverse interpretations of the play, to map a transformation from the local to the global and vice versa. Taking the conventional representation of Hamlet by Kenneth Branagh in his 1996 film adaptation as a frame of reference, it examines two other versions of Hamlet, the absurdist, meta theatrical experiment; ‘Hamlet: The Clown Prince’, directed by Rajat Kapoor and the musical, a Stockhausen media production of 2007, ‘Hamlet in Rock’.

Keywords: Adaptation, Eurocentrism, Post-Colonial, Absurdist, Rock

Sengupta, Purbali. “Re-Imagining Shakespeare as Our Contemporary- Alternate Interpretations of Hamlet in the Theatrical Space: Traversing from Local to Global and Vice Versa; an Attempt at Dismantling the Canon or Perpetuating Its Transience?” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 1. Crossref. Web.

Is There an Audience in the Lady’s Bedchamber? Shakespeare’s Dramatic Trope in the Sleep-Walking Scene in Macbeth

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.13-21

Manidip Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 13-21

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.13-21

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 1-12

Is There an Audience in the Lady’s Bedchamber? Shakespeare’s Dramatic Trope in the Sleep-Walking Scene in Macbeth

Manidip Chakraborty

Assistant Professor, Dept of English, Bhairab Ganguly College, West Bengal State University, India. Mail ID: manidipfalta@gmail.com ORCID ID: 0000-0001-9421-0196

Abstract

In William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the famous Sleep-Walking scene of Lady Macbeth also includes two observers, the Waiting-Gentlewoman and the Doctor of Physic, who play multiple roles during this scene, as well as in the development of the Lady’s character. In their somewhat choric role, they amplify the Lady’s utterances, and sway the audience’s attitude. In applying the moral yardstick, their brief observation and comments are really significant. Standing in-between the Lady and the audience, they let the playwright employ his favourite trope of play-within-the-play. In their crucial roles as interpreters, they also help the critics establish the gendered logocentrism in analysing events and characters.

Keywords: Audience, Experience, Metatheatre, Performance, Knowledge

Chakraborty, Manidip. “Is There an Audience in the Lady’s Bedchamber? Shakespeare’s Dramatic Trope in the Sleep-Walking Scene in Macbeth.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 13. Crossref. Web.

The Bifocality of Dance in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: An Analysis of Shakespearean Dance Adaptations

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.22-30

Kimberly M. Glassman

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 22-30

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.22-30

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 22-30

The Bifocality of Dance in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: An Analysis of Shakespearean Dance Adaptations

Kimberly M. Glassman

PhD student, Queen Mary University London, United Kingdom. Mail Id: kim.m.glassman@gmail.com  | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-6990-8856

Abstract

Drawing on Lynsey McCulloch’s notion of Shakespeare in dance and Shakespeare as dance, this paper explores the bifocality of Shakespeare and dance in Twelfth Night. In Illyria, a realm of fantasy, dance is a measure of dismantling, whilst maintaining, a cosmic order. Taking a psychohistorical approach, I draw on Alan Brissenden’s 1981 Shakespeare and the Dance, which delves into the moral implications of dancing in Shakespeare’s time. Moving from print to performance and screen, I venture into an analysis of Boris Eifman’s 1986 ballet-film adaptation of Twelfth Night. By adding layers of fiction as both a ballet and film, Eifman’s work enhances Shakespeare’s utopian/dystopian realm of Illyria and taps into the aforementioned psychological undertones. Eifman’s literal use of dance transforms the play into a psychological sensorial experience and delves deeper into the implications of dance hinted at in the text. Most interesting, by adapting words to movement, Eifman uses dance to both conceal and reveal elements of the story. By engaging in an analysis of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night text and subsequent dance adaptations one may witness the bifocality of Shakespeare and dance, and the complexity it brings to our understanding of Shakespeare then and now.

Keywords: Dance Adaptation, Twelfth Night, Boris Eifman, Bifocality of Shakespeare and Dance, Experimental Russian Ballet

Glassman, Kimberly M. “The Bifocality of Dance in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: An Analysis of Shakespearean Dance Adaptations.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 22. Crossref. Web.

Contemporising the Topos of Shakespearean Dramas:  A Comparative (Re)Reading of Memory, Masculinity and Vengeance with special reference to William Shakespeare’s Tragedies and History Plays

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.31-38

Rahul Kar 1, Sangeeta Saha2

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 31-38

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.31-38

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 31-38

Contemporising the Topos of Shakespearean Dramas:  A Comparative (Re)Reading of Memory, Masculinity and Vengeance with special reference to William Shakespeare’s Tragedies and History Plays

Rahul Kar 1

1Assistant Teacher of a Govt. School, An M.A in English Literature from University of North Bengal, West Bengal, India. Email id-thisisrahulapd@gmail.com | Orcid ID: 0000-0001-7362-8788

Sangeeta Saha2

2Assistant Teacher of a  Govt. School, An  M.A in English Literature from University of North Bengal, West Bengal, India. Email id.-sohasaha3010@gmail.com | Orcid ID: 0000-0002-7362-8443

Abstract

This present paper anticipates several prevalent topos of Shakespearean plays especially in tragedies and history plays where both the authors endeavor to (re)vivify issues like virility, madness, retaliation and memory. The play Henry V epitomizes undaunted mental or moral qualities and upstanding ardor and comes into the view of himself, a machinery of careful consideration of what will be necessary or may happen in the future. Together the authors zero in on how the abstractions of these terms facetiously , had sown in the faculty of sensibility, cognition, action of meditating and in the performance of putting something into operation after exquisite synthesis of the playwright so that he could so effortlessly orchestrate profligacy of humans for the characters to become destiny. Macbeth, Hamlet, Titus and so on are no malevolent rather one of the primordial sins among seven that overmatches the gracious traits overarchingly and get at conclusive decimation. The paper also homes in on deciphering the implicit hortative exhortation for all to chase yea and nay, disequilibrium and unreasonableness on no account so that the human psyches shall hold out subsist unblemished forevermore.

Keywords: Madness, Masculinity, Vengeance, Mnemonic, Drama, Tragedy, History Plays.

Kar, Rahul. and Saha, Sangeeta. “Contemporising the Topos of Shakespearean Dramas: A Comparative (Re)Reading of Memory, Masculinity and Vengeance with Special Reference to William Shakespeare’s Tragedies and History Plays.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 31. Crossref. Web.

Biographical Criticism of Shakespeare in Bengal: A Close Study of S.C. Sengupta’s “Shakespeare the Man”

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.39-48

Dr. Samik Sen

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 39-48

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.39-48

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 39-48

Biographical Criticism of Shakespeare in Bengal: A Close Study of S.C. Sengupta’s “Shakespeare the Man”

Dr. Samik Sen

Assistant Professor, Naba Barrackpur Prafulla Chandra Mahavidyalaya, West Bengal, India.

Mail Id: samik234@rediffmail.com| Orcid Id: 0000-0002-4611-6151

Abstract

The paper attempts to read S.C.Sengupta’s essay Shakespeare the Man closely and critically and find out what ideological motivations have contributed to the construction of a biographical criticism of Shakespeare in Bengal. It has ventured to examine the connections that such Biographical literary criticism has with the Romantic idea of authorship and the aesthetic autonomy that the Romantics so passionately foregrounded. Alluding to Tagore’s thesis that the poet in his day-to-day life is much like an ordinary man, while he lives a larger and more intense life which is reflected in his poetry S.C. Sengupta has pleaded for the reconstruction of the inner life of a poet from his works. What this paper has aspired to excavate from Sengupta’s essay is an alternative idea of subjectivity that transcends the personality of the poet. Though this notion seems to foreground the Modernist creed of objectivity and impersonality, the paper has tried to show that it can be traced back to the aesthetic ideology of Romanticism which emphasized the inability and ineffectuality of the poet to understand the roots of his creation.

Keywords: Biography, Authorship, Aesthetic Autonomy, Transcendental Subjectivity

Sen, Samik. “Biographical Criticism of Shakespeare in Bengal: A Close Study of S.C. Sengupta’s ‘Shakespeare the Man.’” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 39. Crossref. Web.

Revamping Shakespeare: Filmic Adaptation of Romeo and Juliet into Goliyon ki Rasleela RamLeela

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.49-57

Dr. Neenu Kumar

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 49-57

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.49-57

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 49-57

Revamping Shakespeare: Filmic Adaptation of Romeo and Juliet into Goliyon ki Rasleela RamLeela

 

Dr. Neenu Kumar

Associate Professor, Department of English, Aditi Mahavidyalaya, University of Delhi, India.

Mail Id: neenu@aditi.du.ac.in  | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-4619-9292

Abstract

Sanjay Leela Bhansali gives a regional flavour to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet by placing it in Gujarat. He looks at it from a local perspective. There are, however, many subtexts in Bhansali’s movie: importance given to festivals, mythologizing the original text, depiction of women and their oppression at the hands of the patriarchal society. Widows presented in the movie do not find any counterparts in the Shakespearean play. Then, there are women who have minds of their own and resist: Dhankor Baa reminds the audience of Lady Capulet while parallels can be drawn between Leela and Juliet. Some women show ‘signs of agency’ at the end of the ‘adaptation.’ Local politics and national tensions make their way into RamLeela, clearly indicating that the movie is not merely an ‘adaptation’ but also a ‘masala Bollywood film,’ with its share of song and dance sequences, item number, ‘violent skirmishes’ between the two clans and the plotting to kill innocent people under the aegis of enmity. This makes it a unique combination. RamLeela gives a peep into modern India with its share of uncertainties, complications and the entangled weave of hatreds, jealousies and misunderstandings. 

The present paper looks at RamLeela as a modern day adaptation of Romeo and Juliet in the Indian context.

Keywords: Race, Valour, Fate, Social Construct, Inter-Personal Conflicts

Kumar, Neenu. “Revamping Shakespeare: Filmic Adaptation of Romeo and Juliet into Goliyon Ki Rasleela Ram-Leela.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 49. Crossref. Web.

Gendered Guise: Shakespeare’s use of Transvestism and Gender Appropriation in his Plays

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.58-68

Sanghita Sanyal

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 58-68

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.58-68

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 58-68

Gendered Guise: Shakespeare’s use of Transvestism and Gender Appropriation in his Plays

Sanghita Sanyal

Assistant Professor, Departments of English and B.Ed., Loreto College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Mail Id: sanghita.mail@gmail.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-2345-5951

Abstract

Often, transvestism or cross-dressing, (that is, wearing normative, gender-designated attire of the opposite sex) is both a leitmotif and a theatrical device in William Shakespeare’s plays.  It not only serves as an integral element of a narrative/plot but it is also a dramatic device that is applied in order to preclude the woman as an actor (vis-a-vis her accepted participation) in the plays. Naturally therefore, transvestism or using socially-determined attires open up newer discourses on cultural and gender stereotypes in Shakespeare’s performative art, when cross-dressing was a somewhat compulsive alternative abiding the social mores of that time, which did not quite expect women’s active participation on-stage. In this paper we shall read how this gender imbalance on Shakespearean stage made the dramatis personae and the crew more significant, on the basis of their attires, cross-dressing and gender-appropriation on stage. We shall specifically read how the master playwright used cross-dressing also as a theme in his various plays which in a way problematized gender appropriation further.

The present paper looks at RamLeela as a modern day adaptation of Romeo and Juliet in the Indian context.

Keywords: Transvestism, Cross-dressing, Gender, Gender Appropriation, Alternative Sexuality

Sanyal, Sanghita. “Gendered Guise: Shakespeare’s Use of Transvestism and Gender Appropriation in His Plays.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 58. Crossref. Web.

The Moor of Venice: Critically Analysing Othello Based on Race, Colour, Gender as the Social Constructor, and the Facilitator to Kill Desdemona. 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.69-79

Sneha Chakraborty1,  Oly Saha2

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 69-79

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.69-79

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 69-79

The Moor of Venice: Critically Analysing Othello Based on Race, Colour, Gender as the Social Constructor, and the Facilitator to Kill Desdemona. 

Sneha Chakraborty1,   Oly Saha2

Post Graduate Student, Department of Comparative Literature, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Email id – chakrabortysneha1999@gmail.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-5350-0741

Oly Saha

Assistant Professor of English, M.U.C Women’s College, Purba Bardhaman. PhD Candidate, Comparative Literature Department, Jadavpur University. Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Email: olysaha_91@rediffmail.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0001-8658-1886

Abstract

After World War II, Shakespearean critics often found ‘race’ to be an incidental discourse in (c 0.1603). They were rooting for universal humanism and valour portrayed by the Moor of Venice, as their central point of evaluation. The paper would examine whether Othello’s race and his cultural inheritance acted as a facilitator to kill Desdemona or it was the code of conduct (validated by the societal prescriptions) expected of a man in fifteenth-century England, concerning Renaissance ideals. This will be intertwined with examining the notions of ownership and honour in the play and how the ‘motiveless malignity’ affected the ‘fate’ of a woman. Do the tragic incidents happen due to the orchestrated plan by the shoddy opportunist Iago or the tenets of anxiety were always instilled in the mind of Othello even before his marriage with Desdemona? Would the events be different if he did not bear the essence of cultural exclusivity, of being a Moor, in his mind? Would the situation still turn out the way it did if Desdemona was a Moor? The paper would raise these questions and try to find the role of race, gender, and colour by accumulating substantial evidence from the play.

The present paper looks at RamLeela as a modern day adaptation of Romeo and Juliet in the Indian context.

Keywords: Race, Valour, Fate, Social Construct, Inter-Personal Conflicts

Chakraborty, Sneha. “The Moor of Venice: Critically Analysing Othello Based on Race, Colour, Gender as the Social Constructor, and the Facilitator to Kill Desdemona.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 69. Crossref. Web.

Book Review

Rain, Icicle, Heat and Quarantine: Reading Anthropocene: Climate Change, Contagion, Consolation by Sudeep Sen

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.80-86

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 80-86

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.80-86

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 80-86

Rain, Icicle, Heat and Quarantine: Reading Anthropocene: Climate Change, Contagion, Consolation by Sudeep Sen

Reviewed by Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Assistant Professor, Amity Institute of English Studies and Research, Amity University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Mail Id:  schakraborty3@kol.amity.edu | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-2936-222X

Bibliographic Information:

Name of the Book: Anthropocene: Climate Change, Contagion, Consolation

Author: Sudeep Sen

Publisher: Pippa Rann Books & Media, UK. (2021)

Language: English

Paperback: 184 pages

ISBN-978-1-913738-38-9

Price: £19.99 | €24.99 | $29.99 | INR.599 (hardback)

Keywords: Nature, Anthropocene, Poetry

Chakraborty, Sreetanwi. “Rain, Icicle, Heatand Quarantine: Reading Anthropocene: Climate Change, Contagion, Consolation by Sudeep Sen.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 80. Crossref. Web.

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.87-89

Heba Rajili

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 87-89

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.1.2021.87-89

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-1 | July, 2021 | Page: 87-89

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Reviewed by Heba Rajili

Guest Lecturer, Women’s Christian College, Chennai, India

Mail Id: rajiliheba@gmail.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0001-8670-7004

Bibliographic Information:

Name of the Book: The Help

Author: Kathryn Stockett

Publisher: Penguin; Media tie-in edition (13 May 2010)

Language : English

Paperback : 464 pages

ISBN-10: 0141039280

ISBN-13: 978-0141039282

INR 1770 (Hardcover) | INR 188 (Paperback) | $9.6

Keywords: American, Race, Novel

Rajili, Heba. “The Help by Kathryn Stockett.” LITINFINITE JOURNAL 3.1 (2021): 87. Crossref. Web.

Litinfinite Journal does not provide / assign DOI for general section

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