Cover Design by Subrata Gangopadhyay

Litinfinite Journal 

Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019

Drama and Performance: Themes, Styles and Techniques 

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019

 

Sl. No

Title

Section

Page

 

Editorial

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editorial

i

1

English Theatre in Colonial Calcutta: The Case of Mrs. Esther Leach

Dr. Samipendra Banerjee

Article

1-4

2

Heisnam Kanhailal’s Draupadi (2000): A Contemporary Performative Appropriation of the Women’s Question

Ms. Saptaparna Roy

Article

5-10

3

The Forgotten Playwright: Ramanarayan Tarkaratna

Nirban Nandy

Article

11-18

4

Subjugation of Women in Girish Karnad’s Naga-Mandala

Bisnu Charan Mahato

Article

19-23

5

Shantih  Shantih  Shantih:  Western Discordance Resolved by East in Eliot’s The Waste Land

Mousumi Hazra

Article

24-28

6

An interview of Indian Mime Theatre director Padma Shri Niranjan Goswami

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Interview

29-36

7

Interview of the famous female impersonator of Indian Theatre: Chapal Bhaduri

Supriyo Chakraborty

Interview

37-44

8

An interview of Vinay Sharma

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Interview

45-47

9

Duti Kobita (Two Poems)

Mridul Dasgupta

Poem

48-49

10

Assamese poetry by Guna Moran

Translated in English by Bibekananda Choudhury

Poem

50-52

11

Do Not Despair, We Are Together

Dr. Ketaki Datta

Drama

53-57

 

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief-Editor- Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

Editorial
Prof. Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Editor – in – Chief
Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata, WB, India

Victor Hugo had once very rightly said, “The ode lives upon the ideal, the epic upon the grandiose, the drama upon the real.” When it comes to the various discursive components of understanding drama, there is always a need for alterations and modifications. Themes, plot, stage, props, characters, light, sound, action, inaction- all act as several components of a composite whole to highlight the quintessence of drama. In the January issue, we have compiled three interviews of three people who can very well be termed as the ‘veterans’ of Indian drama and theatre. Whereas Chapal Bhaduri’s interview focuses upon the woman impersonator and the evolution of drama, ‘yatra’ and other folk forms, Niranjan Goswami’s take on Indian Mime Theatre and how it stands in stark contrast to the European forms and structures is an equally delectable piece. We also have a third interview in this issue, of Mr. Vinay Sharma, director and a consummate actor who has been holding a laudable position in Indian theatre since a long time. Along with the interviews, the research articles for this issue deal with Assamese theatre, the plays of Mrs. Esther Leach, thematic and stylistic details in the plays of Girish Karnad and coming to the Oriental scene, a look into the works of Ramanarayan Tarkaratna. I am sure that the sheer variety that is expounded through these research articles will definitely chalk out a new innovative avenue for future researchers.

Along with that, the Litinfinite January bouquet also contains short stories, poems in English and Bengali. The poems deal with love, loss, a point of no-return, mundane meanderings of the asylum and even themes like postmodern love and road. Litinfinite always encourages an eclectic blend of the classic and the contemporary, the paths less-travelled and the roads that are always taken. Hence in this issue we also present two interesting articles on drama, one of which deals with modernity, Tagore and the reader’s stand, and the other illumines the readers on border and drama. We are privileged to publish three short play-scripts in Bengali, two by the eminent poet, author and orator Aranyak Basu, and one by Dr. Ketaki Datta, one of the revered members of our editorial board.
I would like to express my sincerest thanks to veteran artist Mr. Subrata Gangopadhyay for the wonderful cover design. Our team also expresses heartfelt thanks to Mr. Susanta Tah for the illustration part, and Mr. Suvendu Mukherjee for the technical assistance.

Team Litinfinite wishes all its readers a very happy new year. Let us all build up a cohesive teamwork that focuses on good reading and more cultural inputs.

Thank you!

English Theatre in Colonial Calcutta: The Case of Mrs. Esther Leach

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.1-4

Dr. Samipendra Banerjee

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 1-4

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.1-4

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 1-4

English Theatre in Colonial Calcutta: The Case of Mrs. Esther Leach

Dr. Samipendra Banerjee
Assistant Professor
Department of English – University of Gour Banga – West Bengal, India
Mail Id: samipendra@yahoo.com

Abstract

When it comes to scholarship on various aspects of Indian theatre, there is still a lot of work that remains to be done. One such area is the colonial theatre of old Calcutta during the nineteenth century. Modernity in the theatre arrived in India with the British and the English theatres of the time influenced the growth and development of Bengali and Indian theatre later. This brief paper examines the history of two playhouses of English theatre around the middle of the nineteenth century—the Chowringhee Theatre and the Sans Souci Theatre, and recounts how Mrs Esther Leach almost single-handedly led the scene and established the Sans Souci theatre. This article glimpses at the performance culture of the time and wishes to rekindle interest in the theatres of a bygone era in order to better understand the history and politics of theatre.

Keywords: Theatre, stage, historiography, English actress, Colonial Calcutta

Banerjee, Samipendra. “English Theatre in Colonial Calcutta: The Case of Mrs. Esther Leach.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 1. Crossref. Web.

Heisnam Kanhailal’s Draupadi (2000): A Contemporary Performative Appropriation of the Women’s Question

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.5-10

Saptaparna Roy

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 5-10

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.5-10

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 5-10

Heisnam Kanhailal’s Draupadi (2000): A Contemporary Performative Appropriation of the Women’s Question

Saptaparna Roy
Assistant Professor of English
Department of Humanities
Heritage Institute of Technology- West Bengal, Kolkata, India
Mail Id: saptaparna.roy2013@gmail.com

Abstract
Bengali writer Mahasweta Devi’s short story “Draupadi” (1978), one that has found a place in all the major collections on women’s writing in India, pitted against the Naxalite rebellion in the late 1960s in the Naxalbari area in West Bengal contextualizes and contemporanizes Draupadi’s public disrobing in the epic Mahabharata through the eponymous character’s state-sanctioned militarized rape. The theatrical potential of the final scene was captured in 2000 by Padmabhusan Heisnam Kanhailal in his play with the same title in Manipuri language as a performative appropriation, wherein literature represents contemporary reality to voice the protest of Northeastern women enduring torture, assault and carnage by the Indian Army. Incidentally, the following events of Thangjam Manorama’s rape and murder, the Meitei women’s naked protest in Imphal, Irom Sharmila’s fast and many others beyond the Northeast have materialised the act into action, pushing the margin to the centre of discourse on the women’s question in India. The feminist translation of the Mahabharata into Mahasweta Devi’s short story to the adaptation on stage performed by the ace actor Sabitri Heisnam and finally, the spiralling reality of rape raises questions on the relation between nation and gendered violence, play and protest, rape and the female body, victimhood and agency, femininity and patriarchy, power and class or caste, and ideology and practice. This paper will examine the much-contested women’s question in India within a postcolonial feminist theoretical framework to review how the play Draupadi’s marginalized political context of the Northeast with a separatist troubled history blurs boundaries and expands into an Indian panoramic reality and inverting hegemonic paradigms and re-scripting history.

Keywords: women’s question, state, gendered violence, rape, female body

Roy, Saptaparna. “Heisnam Kanhailal’s Draupadi (2000): A Contemporary Performative Appropriation of the Women’s Question.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 5. Crossref. Web.

The Forgotten Playwright: Ramanarayan Tarkaratna

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.11-18

Nirban Nandy

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 11-18

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.11-18

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 11-18

The Forgotten Playwright: Ramanarayan Tarkaratna

Nirban Nandy
Guest Faculty – Department of English
University of Engineering and Management – Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
Mail Id: englishhons.nirban.nandy@gmail.com

Abstract
Ramanarayan Tarkaratna (1822- 1886) was a predecessor of the great figure of Bangla as well as of Indian literature(s) Michael Madhusudan Dutt; though nearly forgotten at present, once Ramanarayan was an eminent and prominent personality of the Bangla theatrical space. I would like to consider him as the guiding figure of realistic poetics of Bangla theatre. In 1854, his play Kulinkulasarbaswa dawned on the new age of Bangla theatre. The play is the first original Bangla play to be staged; it also has the merit of being the first-ever original Bangla play dealing with the serious social evils such as Kulin system of the Bengal Brahminism enforced by King Ballala Sena of the Sena Dynasty, and also polygamous ventures undertaken by Brahmin males. With these primary problems at stake, the play also deals with related issues such as education for women, women and society, and marriage. The composition and enactment of the play, Kulinkulasarbaswa, successfully began a new theatrical movement with a progressive outlook and inclusive nature. Ramanarayan, as a playwright, stands as the bridge between the olden forms of Sanskrit drama, and various folk practices (like jatra, palagan, etc) and the youthful arrival of the western theatrical practices, aesthetics and dramaturgy. Not only as a dramatist, but also on the merit of being a person of progressive mentality has Ramanarayan chosen to stand with the progressive side of the then Bengal intelligentsia including Ishwarchandra Vidyasagar, Madanmohan Tarkalankar, et al. His plays, including his magnum opus Kulinkulasarbaswa and Nabanataka, advocate progressive consciousness and warm welcome towards the arrival of the new. The paper aims at the reading and analysis of the plays by Ramanarayan Tarkaratna, with special focus upon his masterpiece Kulinkulasarbaswa to trace the socio-literary changes occurring in the 19th century; the entrance of new consciousness; and the quest and establishment of a new identity.

Keywords: Bangla theatre, progression, drama, society

Nandy, Nirban. “The Forgotten Playwright: Ramanarayan Tarkaratna.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 11. Crossref. Web.

Subjugation of Women in Girish Karnad’s Naga-Mandala

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.19-23

Bisnu Charan Mahato

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 19-23

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.19-23

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 19-23

Subjugation of Women in Girish Karnad’s Naga-Mandala

Bisnu Charan Mahato
Ph.D Scholar- Department of English, Ranchi University, Jharkhand, India
Mail Id: bisnu.charanmahato@gmail.com

Abstract

One of the Prominent playwright Girish Karnad in most of his plays, meticulously presents the ordeal of a typical Indian female, dominated and exploited by the patriarchal society while the spirit of the caged women strive for liberation from the chains of inequality, superstition, myth and tradition. In his play ‘Nagamandala’ (In Sankritwhich meansa sacred aura related to or made by naga). Karnad has dealt gender concern in his plays while exposing and criticizing the male chauvinism prevalent in patriarchal society.The author uses myths and folks in his plays to eradicate socio-cultural evils. The playwright Karnad accentuated problems of and treatment to a woman in contemporary biased patriarchal social order in his plays and exposes the prevalent double standard towards women in patriarchal society.

Keywords— Subjugation of Women, Patriarchy, Nagamandala

Mahato, Bisnu Charan. “Subjugation of Women in Girish Karnad’s Naga-Mandala.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 19. Crossref. Web.

Shantih Shantih Shantih: Western Discordance Resolved by East in Eliot’s The Waste Land

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.24-28

Mousumi Hazra

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 24-28

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.24-28

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 24-28

Shantih Shantih Shantih: Western Discordance Resolved by East in Eliot’s The Waste Land

Mousumi Hazra
Ph.D Scholar – Department of English, North Bengal University, West Bengal, India
Email Id: mousumihazra41407@gmail.com

Abstract

T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land (1922) has become a gloomy representation of his religious faith, spiritual emptiness and devastation in the Western culture. The last chapter of the poem “What the Thunder Said” contains Hindu religious words like datta, dhayadhvam, damyata and shantih. This paper attempts to focus on how the Hindu religious ideas in the poem are working in the context of Eastern or Western domain. Hence this paper quests for the answer of the following question: is it a way of salvation that Eliot provides for the Waste land or a temporal escape to avoid the disruption? Do these words end up solving the discordance of the west? What is the position of Eliot as one of the empty men in the Waste land? The paper seeks for the authorial intention behind the universal dimension which rather favours a pessimistic understanding of the poem.

Keywords: Modernism, religion, orient, Hinduism, Buddhism

Hazra, Mousumi. “Shantih Shantih Shantih: Western Discordance Resolved by East in Eliot’s The Waste Land.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 24. Crossref. Web.

An interview of Indian Mime Theatre director Padma Shri Niranjan Goswami

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.29-36

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 29-36 | Interview 
(This paper / interview is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.29-36

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 29-36
(This paper / interview is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

An interview of Indian Mime Theatre director Padma Shri Niranjan Goswami

Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata
Email Id: schakraborty3@kol.amity.edu

Abstract

The given interview gives an insight into the world of Indian mime theatre. Niranjan Goswami is a world-famous, veteran mime artiste and director, who have received multiple awards and numerous accolades for his work on Indian mime theatre. He has been attached with several government projects on culture and performance. In this interview, he mainly talks about the history of Indian mime theatre and the resources that made the Indian mime a different one from the erstwhile Western influences. The interview takes into perspective performance, performativity, body movement, gesture, the usability and reception of mime as an art form etc. Moreover, the given interview also illuminates the variations of the mime forms across different geographical locations and how they sustain the overall spirit of a nation. The last part of the interview takes a walk down memory lane where Niranjan Goswami talks about the current scenario in areas of mime across the nation and how can it be sustained as an art form. He takes pride in the way that many of his students are working in different regions of the nation, with innovative techniques applied to mime.
Keywords: Indian Mime Theatre, Mime, Indian Theatre, Drama, Indian English

Niranjan Goswami: Born in 1949 in Sonargaon in Dhaka area of Bengal now a piece of Bangladesh, Shri Niranjan Goswami examined show at Rabindra Bharati University, Kolkata, getting a Master’s qualification. He prepared in emulate with Jogesh Dutta from 1966 to 1969 at the last’s establishment Padaboli, and prepared himself in theater working with Sombhu Mitra at Bohurupee somewhere in the range of 1970 and 1975. He set up the Indian Mime Theater in 1976. Shri Goswami has propelled the act of emulate as an autonomous class in Indian venue with his exhibitions in the course of recent decades.

Among his critical productions are Sonarganyer Meye (1983), Dena Paona (1989), Srikanta (1990), Beej (1995), and Nagamandala (1997). A large portion of these depend on notable scholarly works. To develop a group of people for emulate, Shri Goswami has been sorting out celebrations of emulate theater since the mid-1980s. He has additionally shown emulate at a few establishments, remembering the National School of Drama for Delhi, the Trissur School of Drama, and the Film and Television Institute of India, Pune. He has given talk showings at the University of California at Los Angeles, U.S.A., and the Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi. Shri Goswami has been working with hard of hearing kids for quite a long while, some of whom have won youthful Talent Scholarships of the Govern-ment of India. He has acted in the World Youth Festival (1989) in Pyongyang, North Korea, and the Shanghai International Art Festival (2002) in China, and has other than visited Europe, the previous Soviet Union, and the United States as a social agent. Among different distinctions, he has gotten the All India Critics Association Award in 1998. He was granted a Senior Research Fellowship by the Department of Culture, Government of India, in 2001. Shri Niranjan Goswami gets the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for his exceed expectations lence as an on-screen character in emulate.

Note: This is an interview conducted in Bengali and there is no citation or works cited required. It is a live interview taken by Sreetanwi Chakraborty, Chief-Editor of Litinfinite Journal.

Chakraborty, Sreetanwi. “An Interview of Indian Mime Theatre Director Padma Shri Niranjan Goswami.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 29. Crossref. Web.

Interview of the famous female impersonator of Indian Theatre: Chapal Bhaduri

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.37-44

Supriyo Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 37-44 |Interview 
(This paper / interview is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.37-44

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 37-44 
(This paper / interview is written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Interview of the famous female impersonator of Indian Theatre: Chapal Bhaduri

Supriyo Chakraborty
Publisher, Litinfinite Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Entrepreneur, Digital Marketing Strategist and Play director
Certified Google and Microsoft Analytic

Abstract:

The given interview delves deep into the performative and psychological aspects of a female impersonator. Chapal Bhaduri was born a boy and he had an enriched theatrical background in his home. In this interview he talks about his initial performance, the struggles of his later life, and his role-playing as a female impersonator. The area of gender studies and gender and performativity are replete with numerous nuanced variations in terms of understanding the impact on the actor/actress on stage. Alterations and changing roles played by a man who impersonates a woman on stage, is therefore, liable to have an expansive outreach altogether. In this interview, Bhaduri also laments the current condition of the Indian yatra and the different types of media that have taken a toll on the traditional forms of theatre.

Chapal Bhaduri: Chapal Bhaduri is a legendary character in the field of Indian theatre and plays. He has been doing the role of a female impersonator in regional Yatras and folk theatres of Bengal. He was born into a family of theatre personalities –his father Tara Kumar Bhaduri and mother Prava Debi both were from theatre background. His voice has been bearing a female tenor and he has been working as a female impersonator in many of the prominent Indian regional plays. There have been multiple documentaries on him, and a renowned tele-film Ushnotar Janye has also paid tribute to this doyen of Indian regional theatre.

Keywords: Female Impersonator, Indian English drama, Indian theatre, Performance Studies, Gender Studies

Note: This is an interview conducted in Bengali and there is no citation or works cited required. It is a live interview taken by Supriyo Chakraborty, Publisher of Litinfinite Journal.

Chakraborty, Supriyo. “Interview of the Famous Female Impersonator of Indian Theatre: Chapal Bhaduri.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 37. Crossref. Web.

An interview of Vinay Sharma
Sreetanwi Chakraborty

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.45-47

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 45-47 | Interview 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.1.2.2019.45-47

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 45-47

An interview of Vinay Sharma
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata
Email Id: schakraborty3@kol.amity.edu

Abstract

This interview mainly highlights the current trends in the field of Indian English play, the stage and different theatrical aspects. Vinay Sharma is an actor, a theatre director and a writer who has a major role to play in the development of the Padatik theatre group in Kolkata. Here he talks about his theatrical motivation, inspiration and how the whole concept of proscenium theatre has undergone a major change in the last 20 years. Moreover, he also talks about instinct and intuition while channelizing the creative potential in any play. The overall interview talks about the changing scenario with reference to theatre, performance, stage and audience.

Vinay Sharma: Vinay Sharma is an actor, director, and a writer who started his career in Padatik theatre based in Calcutta since 1981. His imaginative and creative thoughts were amply portrayed in major plays and he received critical appreciations for playing some major roles under well-known directors like Shyamanand Jalan, Rodney Marriot, and Usha Ganguly. His production of ‘Atmakatha’ starring Kulbhushan Kharbanda featured at the 8th Theatre Olympics. ‘Ho sakta hai’, ‘Do Aadmi Do Kursiyaan’, ‘Camera Obscuras’, ‘Yahan’ and ‘Yawah Goi’ are some of the prominent plays written by Sharma. Apart from that, he has also performed the monologue ‘Mark Twain: Live in Bombay’ written by the Canadian playwright Gabriel Emmanuel in 2018 and it was shortlisted for the TLM New Writing Award 2006 and The Bridport Poetry Prize 2017. Known for his consummate craftsmanship, innovative stage presence and growing contribution to Indian theatre, Sharma is definitely one of the most-recognized names not just in Kolkata, but also worldwide.

Keywords: Indian Theatre, Theatre, Audience, Indian English Drama, Proscenium

Chakraborty, Sreetanwi. “An Interview of Vinay Sharma.” Litinfinite Journal 1.2 (2019): 45. Crossref. Web.

General Section

Duti Kobita (Two Poems)
Mridul Dasgupta

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 48-49 | Poetry Section

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 48-49

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Duti Kobita (Two Poems)
Mridul Dasgupta
Poet and Ex-Journalist
Mail Id: mriduldasgupta@gmail.com

Abstract
The given poems are two pieces of Modern narrative. There is a vast design in the universe; with each and every circuit reflecting the intense spirit of creation, man just becomes a simple puppet in the hands of the myth and realistic virtues of creation. Traversing the vastness of the ocean, the mountains and the deserts, what remains is a small bird that picks up grains of stars from the star-studded night sky. There are images and symbols all around us that interweave the all-inclusive relationship between the transience of human life and the permanence of the universe. Moreover, the poem fragments also deal with the mundane nature of human existence at the most ultimate level.

Keywords: Human bonding, Indian English Poetry, Poetry, Love Poetry, Modern Poetry

Mridul Dasgupta. (2019). Duti Kobita (Two Poems). Litinfinite journal, 1(2), 48–49.

Assamese poetry by Guna Moran
Translated in English by Bibekananda Choudhury 

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 50-52 | Poetry Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 50-52

Assamese poetry by Guna Moran
Guna Moran
Poet and critic – Assam, India
Mail Id: gunagelakey85@gmail.com

Translated in English by Bibekananda Choudhury
Editor-in-Chief, Dimorian Review Web Journal – Assam, India.
Mail Id: dimorianreview@gmail.com

Title: So vast is the sky

Abstract: There has been a long tradition of translating from indigenous languages. The original poem from Assamese language receives a translated English version here. The poet talks about the vast and incomprehensible patterns of the universe that has an option for God to descend (as a part of some mythical human beliefs). The narrative talks about the impenetrable nature of the firmament, and even that sad stupor when the sky becomes cast with layers of cloud. It is a fine blend of symbolism, yearning to know the enigma called universe.

Keywords: Translation, Indian English Poetry, Poetry, Modern Poetry, Symbols

Bibekananda Choudhury. (2019). Assamese poetry by Guna Moran (Translated in English by Bibekananda Choudhury). Litinfinite Journal, 1(2), 50–52. 

Do Not Despair, We Are Together

Dr. Ketaki Datta

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 53-57 | Drama Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-1, Issue-2 | December, 2019 | Page: 53-57 | Drama Section

Do Not Despair, We Are Together

Dr. Ketaki Datta
Associate Professor
Department of English, Bidhannagar College
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail Id: ketaki.datta@gmail.com

Abstract

The given play talks about an old age home that is situated in a mofussil town at a little distance from the city. There are several characters and they share love, bonding and affection for the inmates of the old age home. Sometimes, there is dispersal of old and traditional values where the cultural and family bonding suffers from trauma and erosion of emotions. On the other hand, there are also levels of people who truly care for the inmates of the old age home not in terms of hypocrisy, but only to serve humanity better. Staying together does not terminate the connection between individuals, but it makes the human bonding stronger in critical times.

Keywords: Drama, Text, Stage, Performance, English Theatre

Dr. Ketaki Datta. (2019). Do Not Despair, We Are Together. Litinfinite Journal, 1(2), 53–57. 

Litinfinite Journal does not provide / assign DOI for the general section

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