Cover Design by Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal 

Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020

World Poetry – Poetry Beyond Borders

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020

Sl. No

Title

Section

Page

 

Editorial

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editorial

i-ii

1

The Genre “Novel in Verse” & Alexander Pushkin’s “Eugene Onegin”

Dr. Girish Munjal

Article

1-10

2

Chasing the Jeepney: Marxist Reading in Ruth Elynia S. Mabanglo’s PaghabolngDyip

Ariel Ursolon Bosque

Article

11-16

3

Decanonizing Cultural Myths: A Reading of Sanjukta Dasgupta’s Lakshmi Unbound: A Soliloquy

1. Sayan Parial 2. Dr. Samipendra Banerjee

Article

17-21

4

From Epic Characters to a Movie Transformation: Tracing the Journey of Beowulf from Old English Poetry to Contemporary Motion Picture

1. Trishita Gautam 2. Piyush Kumar Banerjee

Article

22-29

5

Marianne Moore’s “Pigeons:” A Gateway Poem to Unveiling Eating Disorders in Her Poetry

Jessica (Tyner) Mehta

Article

30-38

6

Reading a Textual Analysis and Nature in “Full Moon and Little Frieda” by Ted Hughes

Shamaila Amir

Article

39-43

7

Poetry and Pandemic: A Study of Two Viral Social-Media Poems During COVID 19 Lockdown

Sreejata Roy

Article

44-53

8

An interview with poet Ashwani Kumar

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Interview

54-61

9

An interview with poet Dr. Santosh Alex

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Interview

62-67

 

 

Poetry (General Section)

  

10

Selected Poems by Dr. Devendra Kumar Devesh

Translated by

1. Falguni Ghosh

2. Dr. Anupam Kumar

Poetry

68-77

11

Japanese Watch/Pierrot in London by Dimana Ivanova

Translated by Tom Phillips

Poetry

78-82

12

Twenty years and After (Translated from Jibanananda Das’s “Kudi Bachchar Pawrey”)

Dr. Ketaki Datta

Poetry

83-85

13

Redeath

Daya Dissanayake

Poetry

86

14

Priceless and untitled

Sukanya Basu Mallik

Poetry

87

15

 The Centre of Ruth

Prottoy Hamid

Poetry

88

16

Imprints of Memory

Dr. Sudipto Chatterjee

Poetry

89

17

Dead Fish

Debanjan Bhowmick

Poetry

91-91

 

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief-Editor- Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

Editorial

Prof. Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Editor- in-Chief, Litinfinite
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Curating poems, selecting from a host of comprehensible yet often metaphysical, and too often dismal peregrinations of human individuals, is an interesting as well as laborious task. Editing a volume on World poetry comprising research articles, translated and English poems takes both the rational and the sublime. When this issue of Litinfinite Journal was still at the stage of inception, we tried to focus on the role of indigeneity, translation and articulation of emotions, sentiments, society, mores, norms, folks and fables from different regions of the world. We have contributors who have worked on a comparative analysis of how the transformation from an epic poem occurs in films, and what innovative techniques to surpass the earlier How the changing social scenario rings an alarm in the mind of the sentient reader is yet a secondary question. Ranging from the verse quality and novelistic grandeur in the works of Alexander Pushkin, to a Marxist reading of Ruth Elynia Mabanglo’s poem PaghabolngDyip, and then plummeting deeper into the realms of Indian English poems of Sanjukta Dasgupta, to understanding eating disorders by re-reading Marianne Moore’s poetry- the contributors have delved deeper into the various nuanced patterns of understanding not just the vibration, rhythm and rhyme of good poetry but also circumspecting through the ideas of critical thinking, and giving birth to non-textual paradigms beyond the known segment.

            Familiarity breeds contempt, and hence, unfamiliarity beyond the jurisdiction of the known levels of poetic sublimation-that is where the search begins. Between how to ‘be’ and how not to ‘be’, there is a serious aggrandizement of the frantic fiesta of how we coagulate our senses into both refined and coarse poetry. It is the fine cadence or texture of sweet voice or else, it is a translated variety of memory in a nutshell, and we give priority to all the different orchestrations of both monotony and the unfamiliar at the same time. An overstatement about the processes and the paradigms of poetry gives one of the best ideas of how to create even the most exclusively simple non-synchronizing patterns into a cohesive whole. We have covered works by Bulgarian poets in original and in translation, Bengali poets of the Modern period, Hindi poetry woven into the fine textures of social media, society, life, pangs of death that have been superimposed as a part of a decadent culture and the myths of being alive. This issue of the journal also covers poems and articles from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, giving an all-new and more diversified range of experimentation that is done with poetry. It is time we think about transcending the borders and embark upon what we consider part of the SAARC poems. Understanding the national flavours and knitting the paradoxes of socio-political, religious and economic crisis across nations thus no longer remains a child’s play.

Finally, we present two interviews as part of this issue. Words spoken, broken, stranded with uncertainty, amalgamating achievements, desires, moments of passion, self-reflection, joys of learning, self-enrichment and poetry-it starts with poetry, it continues in the same vein until and unless we imbibe the best moments that are lived and others are given some inkling about good poetry in their lives. Our dear poets Prof. Ashwani Kumar and Santosh Alex have given us the elixir of how travelling, reading, interacting and life itself have taught them the great value of poetry.

We welcome the readers to enjoy this platter of poetry across nations, maybe under the prolific patters of a poignant rainy afternoon!

“Like the days that have marched backward,

In the moonlit night, roving around with skirmishes that leave no sore…

We are yet again tied,

Tussled

Truncated under the tirades of poetry…

The world is blithe again,

The barbed wires swash and thud across the ground

The eyes of the unpinned soul peer through

A looking glass, lost and again found.” (Sreetanwi)

Even if we are in the pangs of the pandemic, we still learn to fight. Let us collaborate, find love and resuscitate ourselves through POETRY.

The Genre “Novel in Verse” & Alexander Pushkin’s “Eugene Onegin”

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.1-10

Dr. Girish Munjal

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 1-10

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.1-10

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 1-10

The Genre “Novel in Verse” & Alexander Pushkin’s “Eugene Onegin”

Dr. Girish Munjal
Laureate of Pushkin Medal
Professor, Russian Section,
Department of Slavonic Studies,
University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Mail I.d.: girishmunjal2012@gmail.com

Abstract

The present paper delves into the emergence of genre “Novel in Verse” or “Verse Novel” in Russian Literature. It was introduced by Alexander Pushkin, the most famous literary figure of 19th Century Russian literature, a period considered as its Golden Era. A. Pushkin is revered not only as the father of modern Russian language, by enriching it & winning the respect it deserved but also as the founder of modern Russian literature for his realistic works. This paper is an attempt to understand and study: contribution of Pushkin in the development of the genre “Novel in Verse” in the form of his Lyrical-Epic work called “Eugene Onegin”; his poetic invention in the form of new stanza writing which became famous as “Onegin Stanza”, its influence on writings of other poets, writers all over the world and which made him the undisputed master of poetry.

Keywords: Novel-in-Verse, Pushkin, Onegin, Genre, Poetry, Stanza

Munjal, Girish. “The Genre ‘Novel in Verse’ & Alexander Pushkin’s ‘Eugene Onegin.’” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 1. Crossref. Web.

Chasing the Jeepney: Marxist Reading in Ruth Elynia S. Mabanglo’s PaghabolngDyip

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.11-16

Ariel Ursolon Bosque

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 11-16

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.11-16

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 11-16

Chasing the Jeepney: Marxist Reading in Ruth Elynia S. Mabanglo’s PaghabolngDyip

Ariel Ursolon Bosque
Instruktor (Instructor)
Kagawaran ng Filipino, Kolehiyo ng Edukasyon
Unit Head
Rewards and Recognition, Human Resource Development Center
Rizal Technological University
Mandaluyong, Philippines
Mail I.d.: arielbosquee@gmail.com

Abstract

This paper critiques the poem Paghabol ng Dyip of Ruth Elynia S. Mabanglo. It discusses the facets outside the feminist theme of the poem. It considers manifestations of socio-politico-economic dimensions through the reading using Marxism as the literary lens in the criticism and reinforced by the three factors in assessing through this approach. The study reveals the struggles of the robotic-like life of the workers in the service economy and the dehumanizing exploitation by the manipulative capitalists as portrayed by the suffering of the persona. The mechanized actions are brought by the goal of fulfilling the expectation of other people as they are transforming as commodities that are becoming eroticized objects. The forces of politics in the society, as seen in the poem, are motivated in the exhibition of freedom as the persona has agonized in his/ her enclosures – poverty and exploitation. Depiction of emotional exhaustion was also present. The dependence on the dominant pursuing capitalistic hegemony is added to the prevailing bourgeois values. Mabanglo uses particular metaphors for the capitalization of bigger forces in the community regardless of the gender using Bernardo Carpio – a local fictional character – to embody the workforce. The jeepney represents the persona’s chase in life.

Keywords: Marxism Approach, poverty, exploitation, service economy, ideology

Bosque, Ariel Ursolon. “Chasing the Jeepney: Marxist Reading in Ruth Elynia S. Mabanglo’s PaghabolngDyip.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 11. Crossref. Web.

Decanonizing Cultural Myths: A Reading of Sanjukta Dasgupta’s Lakshmi Unbound: A Soliloquy

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.17-21

Sayan Parial

Dr. Samipendra Banerjee

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 17-21

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.17-21

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 17-21

Decanonizing Cultural Myths: A Reading of Sanjukta Dasgupta’s Lakshmi Unbound: A Soliloquy

Sayan Parial
Postgraduate student, University of Gour Banga
Malda, West Bengl, India
Mail I.d.: sayan.ganguly97@gmail.com

Samipendra Banerjee
Assistant Professor
Department of English
University of Gour Banga
Malda, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d.: samipendra@yahoo.com

Abstract

Myths have always been used as coercive apparatuses to reinforce order and to naturalize gender stereotypes in the phallocentric discourse eliminating and subsiding women’s voice as “other”. Many feminist critics seek to dismantle those institutionalized practices through revising, reimagining and reinterpreting mythological interpretations This paper portrays the deconstructive strain in Sanjukta Dasgupta’s poem “Lakshmi Unbound: A Soliloquy” unmasking the institutionalization of the pure image of a household lady by patriarchal methodolatry and critiques the attribution of meaning through mythical representation by mainstream culture to impose a passive role upon women restricting in the domestic space. This paper also brings to light the commodification of women’s body as a space for control, discipline by the male gaze by treating as a secondary figure to the primacy of the male and demythologizes the myth of the angel in the house.

Keywords: Deconstruction, Demythologization, Commodification, Institutionalization, Space

Parial, Sayan, and Samipendra Banerjee. ‘Decanonizing Cultural Myths: A Reading of Sanjukta Dasgupta’s Lakshmi Unbound: A Soliloquy’. Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 17. Crossref. Web.

From Epic Characters to a Movie Transformation: Tracing the Journey of Beowulf from Old English Poetry to Contemporary Motion Picture

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.22-29

Trishita Gautam

Piyush Kumar Banerjee

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 22-29

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.22-29

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 22-29

From Epic Characters to a Movie Transformation: Tracing the Journey of Beowulf from Old English Poetry to Contemporary Motion Picture

Trishita Gautam
High School Teacher, Department of English
Jyotirmoy Public School
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d.: trishita34@gmail.com

Piyush Kumar Banerjee
Postgraduate Student,
University of Haifa, Israel
Erasmus+ study abroad scholarship recipient
Mail I.d.: piyushhunter23@gmail.com

Abstract
Beowulf, the tale of a celebrated hero and slayer of monsters, is the one of the finest and oldest epic poems of English literature. This poem was finally written down by an unknown poet after being passed on orally from one generation to another for many years. Beowulf has been translated from Old English to contemporary English by many scholars and has also been an inspiration for numerous films and games. Beowulf gives vivid descriptions of ancient Germanic people, an era of hero-worshipping, supernatural beliefs and pagan rituals. It offers a re-living of the centuries-long phase of transformation of Europe. In this magnificent tale of war between ‘the good and the bad’; the human and the monster; the hero and the villain; the saviour and the killer and the stronger and the strongest, there are several characters which stand out. Sturla Gunnarsson’s Grendel and Beowulf (2005) and Robert Zemeckis’ Beowulf (2007) are well-directed movies based on this famous epic. These movies borrow the central idea and characters from the epic while at the same time, also open broader doorways to view and interpret the text through variegated lens. This paper aims to compare and contrast the portrayal of the four important characters of the epic with these two movies. This paper will try to explore the inconsistencies in the depiction of these major characters of this poem in the contemporary films.

Keywords- Beowulf, Hero, Monster, Mother, Film

Gautam, Trishita, and Piyush Kumar Banerjee. ‘From Epic Characters to a Movie Transformation: Tracing the Journey of Beowulf from Old English Poetry to Contemporary Motion Picture’. Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 22. Crossref. Web.

Marianne Moore’s “Pigeons:” A Gateway Poem to Unveiling Eating Disorders in Her Poetry

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.30-38

Jessica (Tyner) Mehta

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 30-38

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.30-38

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 30-38

Marianne Moore’s “Pigeons:” A Gateway Poem to Unveiling Eating Disorders in Her Poetry

Jessica (Tyner) Mehta
Postgraduate Researcher,
University of Exeter
England, United Kingdom
Mail I.d.: jt587@exeter.ac.uk

Abstract

How do eating disorders inform and reveal themselves in works of poetry, such as Marianne Moore’s “Pigeons?” Using archival research at The Rosenbach Museum in Philadelphia along with medical texts and theories of the 1930s – 40s, this paper considers one of Moore’s lesser known, uncollected poems as a means of teasing out how eating disorders play a prevalent role in her oeuvre. Disorders and diseases such as depression, anxiety, and addiction have received plenty of attention as a lens to approaching a poet’s work. However, eating disorders are largely left out of these types of analyses, mirroring the unfortunate fact that eating disorders today are the deadliest, most under-diagnosed, and under-insured of any mental disorder. Such an oversight is glaring, particularly considering how relevant food and hunger are as symbolism in poetry. Failing to incorporate the role(s) eating disorders may play in a likely anorectic’s work (Moore’s) leaves a gaping disparity in a poet’s or poem’s comprehensive literary analysis. This paper aims to play a role in filling this disparity by focusing on eating disorders as lens with Moore’s work.

Keywords: Poetry, Marianne Moore, eating disorders, anorexia, mental health.

Mehta, Jessica (Tyner). “Marianne Moore’s ‘Pigeons:’ A Gateway Poem to Unveiling Eating Disorders in Her Poetry.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 30. Crossref. Web.

Reading a Textual Analysis and Nature in “Full Moon and Little Frieda” by Ted Hughes

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.39-43

Shamaila Amir

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 39-43

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.39-43

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 39-43

Reading a Textual Analysis and Nature in “Full Moon and Little Frieda” by Ted Hughes

Shamaila Amir
Hamdard Institute of Education and Social Sciences,
Hamdard University, Karachi 74600, Pakistan
Mil I.d.:shaminhasan@hotmail.com

Abstract

The description and textual interpretation of the characteristics of a text highlights and takes into account how it is written in the form of a visual message. What any form of textual analysis conveys is that, it throws a resourceful light upon the structural, symbolic and functional qualities available in the text. Textual analysis helps to understand the language, symbols, pictures, and other information contained in the texts with a purpose to get knowledge about the ways people communicate through their language and their experiences. The analysis of a poem also involves in-depth analysis, placing great emphasis on its elements, e.g. rhyme and meter, and contribution of these elements to the meaning of a poem. It often explores the context in which a poem was written with the purpose of analyzing it in a new and unexpected way. This paper aims at the textual analysis of the “Full moon and Little Frieda” written by Ted Hughes. The analysis concludes that the poem is a vivid description of excitement that Hughes is experiencing while observing Frieda’s sudden joy and amusement towards the moon which appears against the canvas of picturesque English countryside. The paper further concludes that Hughes suggests a relationship between humans and nature, and the enormous world which is formed by tiny objects and describes the natural world that he sees and what Frieda sees.

Keywords: Textual analysis, Full Moon and Little Frieda, Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Text analysis

Amir, Shamaila. “Reading a Textual Analysis and Nature in ‘Full Moon and Little Frieda’ by Ted Hughes.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 39. Crossref. Web.

Poetry and Pandemic: A Study of Two Viral Social-Media Poems During COVID 19 Lockdown

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.44-53

Sreejata Roy

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 44-53

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.44-53

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 44-53

Poetry and Pandemic: A Study of Two Viral Social-Media Poems During COVID 19 Lockdown

Sreejata Roy
PhD scholar, Rabindra Bharati University Kolkata-700050, West Bengal, India
Lecturer, Department of English, Jogesh Chandra Chaudhuri College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Mail Id: sreejataroy15@gmail.com

Abstract

The need for poetry and poets in society has been debated since Plato’s age. But at no time perhaps, its significance can be questioned as much as it has been during a crisis that demands immediate and concrete solutions and aid, like a pandemic. However, on the contrary, the current coronavirus pandemic necessitating social isolation and countrywide lockdowns has witnessed a sudden surge in the production of ‘social-media poetry’. The legitimacy of such poetry has often been debated but their popularity has proved that they are far from irrelevant. This paper intends to study two such viral poems, ‘Lockdown’ By Richard Hendrick and ‘The First Lines of Emails I’ve Received While Quarantining’ by Jessica Salfia. Unlike the poem-posts by popular Instapoets, these unembellished poems are by persons from ordinary walks of life with no aspiration to be a professional or famous. The objective is to explore the kind of sentiments readers are falling for at such an epoch shifting time as this and the new directions such poems indicate for contemporary poetry. The study also emphasizes that poetry as a genre is not just relevant but is perhaps more ‘essential’ than it has been in recent history in the wake of such viral poetry during the uncertainties of a pandemic.

Keywords: Pandemic, Viral, Social Media, Poetry, Covid 19 Poems

Roy, Sreejata. ‘Poetry and Pandemic: A Study of Two Viral Social-Media Poems During COVID 19 Lockdown’. Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 44. Crossref. Web.

An interview with poet Ashwani Kumar

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.54-61

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 54-61

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.54-61

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 54-61

An interview with poet Ashwani Kumar

Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata
Email I.d.: schakraborty3@kol.amity.edu

Abstract

This is an interview with Indian English poet Ashwani Kumar who talks about poetry, Indian English and the middle-class aesthetics versus the contemporary Indian English poetry segment. He talks at large about his relationship to poetry, the changes in the realms of Indian English poetry, and the current trends that have marked the poetic geniuses here. English and its original colonial hangover and using English for everyday use-there is also discussion about travelling, how it is related to poetry, and the insurgent desires and dreams that are some of the most major components of every poet’s mind and writing spirit. The translational and transnational aspect of writing also finds special reference in the interview.

Keywords: Poetry, Indian English Poems, Indian Poetry, World Poetry, Aesthetics

Chakraborty, Sreetanwi. “An Interview with Poet Ashwani Kumar.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 54. Crossref. Web.

An interview with poet Dr. Santosh Alex

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.62-67

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 62-67

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.2.1.2020.62-67

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 62-67

An interview with poet Ashwani Kumar

Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata
Email I.d.: schakraborty3@kol.amity.edu

Abstract

In the given interview, poet, writer and translator Dr. Santosh Alex, who is an author of 42 books over the span of several years. In the given interview, he talks about poetry, translation, multilingualism and its features. Along with that, there is also a discussion area about the differences that might arise in case of stories, poems and novels. He also talks about the women poets of Kerala and how his books in English, Hindi and Malayalam have reached have gained popular readership. He also talks about the linguistic narratives that are part of any dominant social structure. Moreover, he also talks about translation and retention of the original flavour of any language.

Keywords: Translation, Poetry, Multilingualism, Indian Poetry, Indian English

Chakraborty, Sreetanwi. “An Interview with Poet Dr. Santosh Alex.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 62. Crossref. Web.

General Section

Selected Hindi Poems by Dr. Devendra Kumar Devesh Translated in English by

Falguni Ghosh 

Dr Anupam kumar

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 68-77 | Poetry Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 68-77

Selected Hindi Poems by Dr. Devendra Kumar Devesh

Devendra Kumar Devesh
Regional Secretary, Sahitya Akademi
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d: rs.rok@sahitya-akademi.gov.in

Translated in English by Falguni Ghosh
Poet, translator and academician
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d.: fghosh2012@gmail.com

Translated in English by Dr Anupam kumar
Associate Professor of English
IIMT College of Engineering Greater Noida
Uttar Pradesh-201310, India
Mail I.d.: anupam.kumar.1974@gmail.com

Abstract

The given poems are a slice of modern life. They are highly tinged with the modern dilemma, suffering and the facade of human life. Sometimes the poems are a social cry, a loss felt at the death of a kinsman or putting soil to the grave of the departed. At some points, the poems also talk about the sweet memories associated with the values and sentiments of human love. Creation of the treasure trove of memories and then gazing into the fierce and harsh face of death, almost have a contrasting effect with the elixir of life. The poems present an interwoven pattern of the lives that are lived, the lives that are not lived and the lives that could have been lived. It is a pattern that is woven through images, symbols and fine strands of rhythmic quality.

Keywords: Modern poem, Poetry, Social Poems, Indian English Poetry, Translation

Ghosh, Falguni, and Anupam Kumar. “Selected Hindi Poems by Dr. Devendra Kumar Devesh (Translation).” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 68-77. Web.

Selected Poems by Dimana Ivanova Translated in English by

Tom Phillips

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 78-82 | Poetry Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 78-82

Selected Poems by Dimana Ivanova

Dimana Ivanova
Administrative Coordinator, Czech Centre Sofia
Bulgarian Mother tongue teacher, Halcyon International School
London, United Kingdom
Mail I.d.: dimanaiv@abv.bg

Translated in English by Tom Phillips

Editor, Balkan Poetry Today
Red Hand Books, United Kingdom
Mail I.d.: t.phillips18@btinternet.com

Abstract

These are selected poems of the Bulgarian poetess Dimana Ivanova from her 2 poetry books: Invitation for a Father (2012) and Alphabet of the desires (2016). The poems are a slice of modern life, with symbols, extended imagery that talk about reflection on love and questions that are pointed toward the realization of human pain, suffering, longing, and the utter futility of waiting. There is penchant for love; there is a reflection on city life and the overall structure of understanding love in modern times. There is a world view spanning across London, talking about Japanese watch, time and emotions that are constantly recollected across borders and time.

Keywords: Modern Poem, World Poetry, Poem, Poetry, Bulgarian Poetry

Phillips, Tom. “Selected Poems by Dimana Ivanova (Translation).” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 78-82. Web.

Translated Poem of late Jibanananda Das, the famous modern Bengali poet

Dr. Ketaki Datta

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 83-85 | Poetry Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 83-85

Translated Poem of late Jibanananda Das, the famous modern Bengali poet

Dr. Ketaki Datta
Associate Professor
Bidhannagar Government College
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d: ketaki.datta@gmail.com

Abstract


The given poem is a translated version of the famous Bengali poem Kudi Bachchar Pawrey by the modern poet Jibanananda Das. It is a love poem that embarks upon a creative journey to see the beloved even after a long span of twenty years. There are numerous natural and ecological references that make the poem more poignant. It is a creative work that takes into consideration the fine blend of English Romantic poetry, nature, understanding the landscape through love, and yearning to meet the beloved after a long gap of twenty years. It is about the affectionate bonding that can be sustained even after a time gap.

Keywords: Modern poem, Poetry, Love poem, English Poem, Translation

Datta, Ketaki. “Translated Poem of late Jibanananda Das, the famous modern Bengali poet (Translation).” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 83-85. Web.

Redeath

Daya Dissanayake

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 86 | Poetry Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 86

Redeath

Daya Dissanayake
Author
SAARC Literary Award and State Literary Award Winner
Former Director/General Manager – Nawaloka group
Galle, Sri Lanka
Mail I.d.: daya@saadhu.com

Abstract

The process of birth is painful, and so is the entire challenge of growing up is conveyed through various images and symbols. There is a comparison between old age and birth, with the ideas of a mystic worldview surrounding birth, death and regeneration. It is a way to point out the sheer inevitability of death and the constant cycle of birth, death and rebirth that continues as a process of the complete universal order. The poem has a transcendental background, an idea of deeper and sublime truths that can be achieved through mysticism. Along with that, with very cryptic and sustained imagery it also points out to the people who suffer, and those who watch other suffer.

Keyword: Death, Mysticism, World Poetry, Birth, Redeath

Dissanayake, Daya. “Redeath.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 86. Web.

Priceless and untitled

Sukanya Basu Mallik

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 87 | Poetry Section

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020 | Page: 87

Priceless and untitled

Sukanya Basu Mallik
Undergraduate Researcher and Poet
Kolkata, India
Mail I.d.: sukanyabasumallik@gmail.com

Abstract

The given poem celebrates the bond of love, care that ensures any type of family bonding over the years. When the entire world is getting alienated and devastated, it is the right idea to generate love and respect among elders and the members of the family, to sustain the overall impact of any relationship. The poem gives in slight short strokes the ideas of bonding, social sympathy and how to take care of the family. The images are light, and the modern streak gives a very simple yet grand appeal to the short lines and an understanding of the modern English poems. It shows the relationship among families, ties, and delving deeper into the nuanced pattern of varied cultures.

Keywords: Modern Poem, Social Poem, Family, English Poetry, English Poem

 

Mallik, Sukanya B. “Priceless and untitled.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 87. Web.

The Centre of Ruth (মায়াকেন্দ্র)

Prottoy Hamid

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 88 | Poetry Section

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 88

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

The centre of Ruth (মায়াকেন্দ্র)

Prottoy Hamid
Associate Professor and HOD
Department of English, Bangladesh Army Institute of Engineering and Technology
Kadirabad Cantonment, Dayarampur, Natore-6439
Mail I.d.: prottoyhamid@gmail.com

Abstract


The given poem is a Modernist love poem that delves deeper into the psyche of love, life, coming to a centre of ruth, affection, bonding and then gradually drifting away. The poem talks about the speaker’s relentless hurrying into the realms of going away, turning not to return after a time, and understanding a final realization that all the different versions of life, love, bonding, affection are pivoted at one central point, that is the point of both divergence and convergence. The poem emphasizes that even the distance itself is a form of illusion. The rhetorical question of the central point remains, and keeps the readers in an arbitrary motion of realizing the truth about creation.


Keyword: Modern Poem, Love Poem, Social Poem, Poetry, Romantic Poetry

Hamid, Prottoy. “The Centre of Ruth.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 88. Web.

Imprints of Memory (স্মৃতিচিহ্ন)

Dr. Sudipto Chatterjee

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 89 | Poetry Section

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 89

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Imprints of Memory (স্মৃতিচিহ্ন)

Dr. Sudipto Chatterjee
Registrar, Department of Medicine, Ramkrishna Mission Seva Protisthan
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d: chatterjee.drsudipto03@gmail.com

Abstract

The given poem is a fine blend of love and the onslaught of modernity. It is call to the beloved who has been remaining in a petrified motion, only to get dissolved into the elixir of life. It is a poem full of the abstractions of human love but at the same time, it also celebrates the best and the most beautiful moments spent in love. The poem transcends the binaries of loving in heart, in mind and then gradually dissolving in higher art. The kites fly, the colourful kites and the kites that mow and gnaw at the core of the heart. Memories still remain as the beloved retains the spontaneity of love forever.


Keywords: Bengali poetry, World Poetry, Regional Poetry, Love Poetry, Modern Poetry

Chatterjee, Sudipto. “Imprints of Memory.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 89. Web.

Dead Fish (মৃত মাছ)

Debanjan Bhowmick

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 90-91 | Poetry Section

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-2, Issue-1 | July, 2020| Page: 90-91

(Poems are written in Bengali, but the abstract, keywords, Author(s) affiliation / details and works cited are available in English and Bengali)

Dead Fish (মৃত মাছ)

Debanjan Bhowmick
Lecturer (State-aided),
Department of English,
Acharya Jagadish Chandra Bose College
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Mail I.d: debanjanbhowmick89@gmail.com

Abstract

The poet persona talks about his failure in life and yielding to the Universe’s stupendous powers. He surrenders by stating that if the Lord wants him to die, he’ll die, and like a dead fish, he’ll float lifelessly over the Ocean of Existence. He entered this world in the garb of a fish, and from there, started his journey which ended in crossing many rivers and seas. But still, he was unable to find out the key to unlock the abstruseness of worldly existence, or even if he has got it, he has lost it. The poem ends with the persona being a dead fish without any remembrance of past events, clustered around by flies with the All Merciful sky upwards. The poem embarks a journey, a quest which starts from the personal sphere and finally merges with the Universal.

Keyword: Modern Poem, Surrender, Garb, Abstruseness, Key

Bhowmick, Debanjan. “Dead Fish.” Litinfinite Journal 2.1 (2020): 90-91. Web.

Litinfinite Journal does not provide / assign DOI for general section

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