Litinfinite Journal | ISSN: 2582-0400 [Online]

LITINFINITE JOURNAL
ISSN: 2582-0400 [Online]
CODEN: LITIBR

Peer-reviewed Journal of Literature and Social Sciences  

Open Access Journal

Litinfinite Journal is indexed by MLA Directory Of Periodicals & MLA International Bibliography, DOAJ, EBSCO, ProQuest, SCILIT, Ulrichsweb & Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, ICI World Of Journals, J-Gate, JISC, ERIH PLUS & other major indexing services 

Cover Design by Nandita Samanta©

Litinfinite Journal 

Vol-III, Issue-II | December, 2021

Contemporary Trends in Postcolonial Studies

Content

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021

Litinfinite Journal, Vol-3, Issue-2, (2nd December, 2021)

Content

Sl No

Title

 

Section

Page

1

Editorial

 

 

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

 

Editorial

i-iii

2

Rethinking Indian Diaspora: Conceptualizing Diasporic Consciousness

Prakash Chandra Pradhan

Article

1-10

3

Re-Narrating the Postcolonial Subject within Neo-Liberal Spaces: A Study on the Role of Travel as Depicted in the Contemporary Postcolonial Novel

Isuru Ayeshmantha Rathnayake

Article

11-20

4

Exploration of Postcolonial Subaltern World in the Literary Works of Maya Angelou and Mukhtar Mai

Jitendar

Prof. Rekha Sharma

Article

21-28

5

Identityshift to Emancipation of Women: Study of Apollo-Dionysus conflict in the Modern Narratives

Dr. Kanak Kanti Bera

Article

29-41

6

Revisiting Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” through the Lens of Post-Colonial Ecocriticism

Sami Hossain Chisty

Article

42-50

7

The Enigma of Identity of the Anglo-Indian Women in Shyam Benegal’s Junoon (1978).

Somdatta Halder

Article

51-60

8

Womanism and Patriarchy in Chimamanda Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus.

Stanley Ordu

Article

61-73

9

Morteza Farhadi, Vernacularism Perspective among Iranian anthropologists

Nazanin Gharaeinejad

Ali Khanmohmmadi

 

Book Review

74-77

10

Review of The Visceral Logics of Decolonization by Neetu Khanna

Fouad Mami

Book Review

78-80

Editorial
Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Chief-Editor- Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata

Editorial
Prof. Sreetanwi Chakraborty
Editor – in – Chief
Litinfinite Journal
Assistant Professor
Amity Institute of English Studies and Research
Amity University Kolkata, WB, India

There has been much speculation over the last few decades regarding the recent trends and developments in the field of postcolonial studies. With the study of various cultures and social backgrounds in several segments of Humanities and Social Sciences, newer perspectives keep emerging as part of reading the trends in postcolonial studies. Questions about the dominant cultures, a set pattern of understanding the postcolonial resistance and angst are rampant, that has led to an all-new study of what constitutes crisis in terms of postcolonial impact. There is a huge impact of understanding the set hierarchy in terms of giving birth to newer hegemonies. Western nationalism and mythology, power structures, struggles in terms of religion, culture and economy have been quite successful in enunciating newer avenues to studying and understanding postcolonialism. What we see now is an experiment with language, dialect, social and political norms, an insight into the larger trajectory of the anomalies and the normalcy conflict that the earlier studies of postcolonialism displayed. The realization of the ‘otherness’ has been strong, often detrimental to the majoritarian forces that studied nations, borders, migration, settlement and colonization under a strict regime. Hence, it becomes essential how and where we study the theoretical framework of otherness that is longlasting, and that has a serious role to play in negotiating the boundaries of culture, caste, subjugation, intolerance and often the enigma surrounding the occident.

            As Janet Wilson, Cristina Sandru, and Sarah Lawson Welsh point out in their major work Rerouting the Postcolonial: New Directions for the New Millennium:

“…the postcolonial has moved in recent years from being a historical marker to a more globally inflected term applicable to a variety of regions.” (Wilson, 2)

In this volume III, issue II of Litinfinite Journal, we therefore, came up with few questions that were mostly targeted to this understanding of the contemporary trends in postcolonial studies. Studying cityscapes and narratives that regularly question the themes of rooted and rootlessness are made part of the study. Films, literary theory, studies on short stories, studies in globalization, everything point out to new discursive formations that go a long way in re-reading postcolonialism from a contemporary perspective. Prakash Chandra Pradhan’s paper highlights how can we assign a multicultural perspective to the study of the Indian diasporic consciousness. Reading the roots and cultures of migrant communities settled across distant locations, treading across the fields of their homeland, and unearthing the complications of place, time, soil, and alienation get filled with difficulty when we tend to study the paper. Numerous references have been made to the erstwhile colonized countries of the world, and the new nations coming to wield power on a greater scale.

            This surely brings us to the concept of how to study the theme of travel and understand the Postcolonial subject within the Neo-Liberal spaces. IsuruAyeshmantha Rathnayake’s paper attempts to study the role of travel in contemporary Postcolonial novels. The researcher has tried to locate the origins and development of parallel postcolonial narratives as represented through a global manifestation of cartography. Undertaking plans for travel across colonial nations and unearthing colonial legacy through an acceptance of the supremacy of the colonial powers have been studied under much critical contradictions. The next paper, Dr. Kanak Kanti Bera’sExploration of Postcolonial Subaltern World in the literary works of Maya Angelou and Mukhtar Mai question the age-old restrictions and traditions of acceptance and subversion. The double forms of postcolonial marginality in case of women who are made subservient is studied and questioned by the two authors. Spanning across diverse geopolitical spaces including Pakistan, and an African-American society where the fear of estrangement, female isolation and resistance through silence also take major forms to study postcolonial impact in a new age. There is also another paper that inquires deeper into the layers of understanding the condition of the postcolonial woman from an Apollo-Dionysus conflict in the Modern Narratives. The paper investigates several exemplary texts, finds out the nuances about how to read a pattern that is found in case of the rising issues in the multilayered contexts of understanding women’s narratives.

            Several layers of postcolonial studies have a dendritic significance. A curious blend in underlining the postcolonial ecocritical impact is highlighted by Sami Hossain Chisty who takes up a new critical angle to the reading of Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant. With pure critical insights into translational impacts, capitalism and Green Orientalism, the paper attempts at studying the biophysical environments and texts. The next paper, Somdatta Halder’s study is an inquiry about the identity of Anglo-Indian women in Shyam Benegal’s Junoon. From the perspective of film studies, acknowledging the dualities in the self-other paradigm and locating a subject-object reading, the author has tried to define the newer goals of underlining the contemporary trends in postconolial studies. Global movements have diversified the narratives of structuring postcolonialism, and simultaneously, they have also given birth to a celebration of traditional cultural roots. Stanley Ordu’s paper titled Womanism and Patriarchy in Chimamanda Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus highlights the larger tendencies of studying racial issues, patriarchal cultures and connectivity through an identification of the subjugated. He locates the female novel, as a protest book against patriarchy, depicts inequalities and injustices done on women by patriarchal traditions, whether Christian, Islamic, or indigenous. These books are both a protest against patriarchal power and a representation of a self-sufficient woman.

Finally, we have two book reviews in this issue, one focusing on multiple angles to studying vernacularism among Iranian anthropologists, and another on The Visceral Logics of Decolonization.

So, here goes Litinfinite Journal Volume III, Issue II for our readers.

I express my sincerest gratitude to all my respected editorial and advisory board members and contributors. I extend my sincere thanks to Nandita Samanta for an exquisite piece of cover design for this issue.

I take this opportunity to thank Penprints Publication, for assisting us with all kinds of technical support for the journal.

Thanking you,

Sreetanwi Chakraborty

Editor-in-Chief

Litinfinite Journal

Kolkata

 

References:

Wilson, J., Sandru, C., & Welsh, S. L. (2009). Re-routing the Postcolonial: New Directions for the New Millennium. Routledge.

Rethinking Indian Diaspora: Conceptualizing Diasporic Consciousness

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.1-10

Prakash Chandra Pradhan

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 1-10

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.1-10

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 1-10

Rethinking Indian Diaspora: Conceptualizing Diasporic Consciousness

Prakash Chandra Pradhan

Professor, Department of English, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005. India.

Mail Id: prakashcpradhan@gmail.com| ORCID ID: 0000-0002-3002-4025

Abstract

Diaspora as a concept has drawn the attention of the scholars for a long time. In recent times, the meaning of the term has been rethought because the earlier meaning of the term associated with homelessness has been reviewed. In the past, the diasporic community were living in a foreign country due to the compulsion of their economic needs. The origin of Indian diaspora traces back to the indenture system introduced by the Imperial regime of Great Britain in the early part of 19th century. Migration to different parts of the world by Indians for trade and commerce, of course, traces back to much earlier in history. The old Indian Diasporas were longing to come back to their homeland because they felt that they were leading a life of deprivation and exploitation. However after independence, the new Diasporas have voluntarily chosen their condition of self-exile for a glamorous life in their chosen destinations. Often they also experience a sense of loss and anguish when they cherish the memory of their cultural roots. These new Diasporas are different from the old as the latter long for intellectual freedom, secularism and liberty for their country. This paper is therefore an attempt to understand a perspective of the old and new Diasporas with reference to select theoretical formulations.

Keywords: Diaspora,Transnationalism, Postcolonialism, Nepantilism, Deterritorialization

Pradhan, P., 2021. Rethinking Indian Diaspora: Conceptualizing Diasporic Consciousness. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.1.

Re-Narrating the Postcolonial Subject within Neo-Liberal Spaces: A Study on the Role of Travel as Depicted in the Contemporary Postcolonial Novel

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.11-20

Isuru Ayeshmantha Rathnayake

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 11-20

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.11-20

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 11-20

Re-Narrating the Postcolonial Subject within Neo-Liberal Spaces: A Study on the Role of Travel as Depicted in the Contemporary Postcolonial Novel

Isuru Ayeshmantha Rathnayake

Lecturer in the Department of English, the University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka.

Mail Id: isuruay_2019@kln.ac.lk

Abstract

The objective of this study is to re-interpret the idea of travel, represented in the postcolonial novel, as a motif that brings out the dialectic influence of neo-liberal values in defining the contemporary postcolonial subject. As a literary cannon, postcolonial literature is primarily concerned with bringing into light the experience of being colonised by the “white” Europeans, and the struggles of oscillating between two value systems, i.e., the indigenous value systems and the values brought into the colonies by the colonisers. Therefore,the years after 1950s saw the emergence of a host of authors, who in their mother tongue or in the coloniser’s tongue narrated such experiences, while various Eastern and Western critics were interested in theorising the postcolonial subject. The present study contends that, a break in the continuity of such a tradition could be observed with the global spread of neo-liberalism during late 1970s and 1980s, which could be discerned through how the idea of travel being represented in the postcolonial novel. Through a close reading of Amitav Ghosh’s In an Antique Land (1992) and Aravind Adiga’s The White Tiger (2008), the study points out the significant role the idea of travel can play in portraying the neo-liberal dialect which has restructured the traditional relationship between colonised and the coloniser. It argues that the emergence of multiple centres of power, liquidation of geographical boarders and the rapid economisation of all spheres of life, have made the polarised relationship of a colonised and a coloniser redundant, demanding a re-narration of postcolonial subjectivity.

Keywords: Postcolonial Literature, Travel, Neo-Liberalism

Rathnayake, I., 2021. Re-Narrating the Postcolonial Subject within Neo-Liberal Spaces: A Study on the Role of Travel as Depicted in the Contemporary Postcolonial Novel. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.11.

Exploration of Postcolonial Subaltern World in the Literary Works of Maya Angelou and Mukhtar Mai

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.21-28

Jitendar1

Prof. Rekha Sharma2

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 21-28

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.21-28

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 21-28

Exploration of Postcolonial Subaltern World in the Literary Works of Maya Angelou and Mukhtar Mai

Jitendar1

1 Research Scholar, Department of English, Himachal Pradesh University Shimla, India.

E-mail kashavjitendar@gmail.com| ORCID ID:

Prof. Rekha Sharma2

2 Dean, Department of Languages Himachal Pradesh University, Summer Hill, Shimla, India.

E-Mail rekhahpu@gmail.com | ORCID ID:000-0003-4964-7748

Abstract

Literature is substantially influenced by ancient and modern theories of literary discourse from the age of Plato and Aristotle, all such theories have played an important role to challenge the set conventions and rules of literature; a major transition is underway in literary discourse. After the emergence of modern and postmodern literary theory, the themes and trends of literary studies havechallenged by number of emerging theories. The result of this changing trend in is in the form of romanticism, feminism, impressionism, imagism, existentialism, structuralism, modernism, postmodernism, and even post-structuralism. To challenge the historiography of postcolonial studies there emerged another branch of study known as subaltern studies. The writers have exposed oppression at the societal, religious and gender levels. It is found that there is an intense period of disillusionment in the history of marginalized women and their representation in the form of writings. They register their protest and resist whatever is detrimental to their quest of identity and self-worth. Literary exploration of self and other is an attempt to give voice to the unvoiced, on the untrodden paths, to investigate the uninvestigated. It is an enterprise to retrieve the void, and the silences in the text mediated, twice through trans-literation and transition. In this research paper an attempt has been made to understand the conditions of women in African American and Pakistani Tribal societies. The two life writings, one of Maya Angelou I Know Why the Cage Bird Sings and the other In the Name Honor by Mukhtar Mai are used to examine their situations in their respective societies under Subaltern perspective.

Keywords: Subaltern world, Postmodernism, Postcolonial, Disillusionment, Caged bird

Jitendar & Sharma, R., 2021. Exploration of Postcolonial Subaltern World in the Literary Works of Maya Angelou and Mukhtar Mai. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.21.

Identity shift to Emancipation of Women: Study of Apollo-Dionysus conflict in the Modern Narratives

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.29-41

Dr. Kanak Kanti Bera

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 29-41

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.29-41

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 29-41

Identity shift to Emancipation of Women: Study of Apollo-Dionysus conflict in the Modern Narratives

Dr. Kanak Kanti Bera

Associate Professor, Department of English, PanskuraBanamali College (autonomous), PurbaMedinipuir, West Bengal-721152,  India.

Mail Id: kanakkbera@yahoo.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0001-9578-0051

Abstract

When it comes to subjugation of women in the Indian context, patriarchal culture plays the most dominant role. Additionally post-colonial experiences also tend to thrust women physically and psychologically into further subjugation. While patriarchy works at the centre of the scheme, post-colonialism forges a shift from the core to the periphery. With an ironic tinge, the latter, by often exposing women to an alien culture, happens to condition eventually their emancipation and identity too. The present paper aims at investigating the complex interactions among different forces—political, social, cultural and psychological—that make the shift from subjugation to emancipation possible. With special reference to six women from the select 20th century narratives, it has been analysed how the feminine ego undergoes a journey from the Apollonian composure to the Dionysian unrest, ignited by the desires for an identity hitherto suppressed by the cultural deterministic agencies. Post-colonial hegemony, creating an amnesia about the cultural determiners (like her past, pedigree or traditional moralities), makes her realize the meaninglessness of her present existence and the potential new identity and emancipation waiting her. To assert her identity, Mrs. Mainwaring wanted to be ‘pukka’; Pecola wanted to internalise the ‘white’ ideal of beauty and love. Drawing from the critical perspectives of post-colonialism, feminism and psychology, the article enumerates the attempts made by women to break away from the different forms of cultural subordination (effected by geographical dislocation, class, caste or gender) to find a new space and identity that can help them grapple with the post-colonial reality.

Keywords: Post-Colonialism, Feminine Identity, Women Emancipation, Dionysian Ego, Cultural Determinism.

Bera, K., 2021. Identityshift to Emancipation of Women: Study of Apollo-Dionysus conflict in the Modern Narratives. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.29.

Revisiting Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” through the Lens of Post-Colonial Ecocriticism

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.42-50

Sami Hossain Chisty

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 42-50

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.42-50

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 42-50

Revisiting Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” through the Lens of Post-Colonial Ecocriticism

Sami Hossain Chisty

Lecturer, Department of English Language and Literature, Notre Dame University, Bangladesh.Mail Id: chistysami@gmail.com| ORCID ID: 0000-0002-8271-4263

Abstract

This paper is an attempt to break away from the canonical reading of George Orwell’s most celebrated essay “Shooting an Elephant” and analyze it from the perspective of post-colonial ecocriticism. Ever since its publication, “Shooting an Elephant” has been viewed as a literary work that depicts the disturbing nature of imperialism and the impacts of its byproducts both on the colonized and the colonizer. This paper postulates that employing such an anthropocentric view while reading a text that projects the predicament of an animal and the exploitation of nature can be an intellectual misjudgment. The symbiosis of post-colonialism and ecocriticism ensures a synergy that is essential for contemporary literary criticism.The project of post-colonial ecocriticism is to re-read the canonical texts common to both fields and trace out ecocritical concerns in postcolonial literature and postcolonial aspects of environmental writing. In this paper, the ideas of post-colonialism in “Shooting an Elephant” have been addressed while keeping the environmental concerns into consideration.

Keywords: Post-Colonial Ecocriticism, Imperialism, Anthropocentric, Symbiosis, Synergy

Chisty, S., 2021. Revisiting Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” through the Lens of Post-Colonial Ecocriticism. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.42.

The Enigma of Identity of the Anglo-Indian Women in Shyam Benegal’s Junoon (1978).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.51-60

Somdatta Halder

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 51-60

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.51-60

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 51-60

The Enigma of Identity of the Anglo-Indian Women in Shyam Benegal’s Junoon (1978).

 

Somdatta Halder

Assistant Professor, Department of Film Studies, West Bengal State University, Kolkata, India

Mail Id: somdatta@wbsu.ac.in| ORCID ID:0000-0002-0677-2808

Abstract

Jean-Paul Sartre argues that human beings are consisted of ‘being’ and ‘nothingness’. They do not bear, unlike nonhuman entities, any predecided meaning or purpose of existence. Rather, they play roles to fashion their ‘self’ and thereby obtain an essence of their being. Though, to be recognized as a ‘self’ the social being requires the look of the ‘other’, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegelremarks that the relation of self/other is not simply that of mutual recognition. Rather, it stimulates the primitive urge of dominating the other.  This ambiguous relation of self/other is the central theme of the veteran Indian director Shyam Benegal’s feature film Junoon. The paper probes into the enigma of identity of the Anglo-Indian women in the concerned film and subsequently addresses such aspects as the Sartrean notions of role-play and bad faith, the influence of the ‘other’ as the look in the identity crisis of the Anglo-Indian women, representation of different cultures in the film, the contradicting elements of cultural enmity and co-existence, and so on.

Keywords: Anglo-Indian Identity, Identity Crisis, Role-Play, Other as the Look, Self/Other

Halder, S., 2021. The Enigma of Identity of the Anglo-Indian Women in Shyam Benegal’s Junoon (1978). LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.51.

Womanism and Patriarchy in Chimamanda Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.61-73

Stanley Ordu

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 61-73

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.61-73

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 61-73

Womanism and Patriarchy in Chimamanda Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus.

Stanley Ordu

Researcher, Chaps Multi-Concept Ltd. Plot 6, Osichi Street off Ikiri, Road, Omoku, Nigeria.

Mail Id: stanleyordu12@gmail.com| ORCID ID: 0000-0003-2137-2842

Abstract

Womanism, as a subset of African feminism, provides a framework for assessing the works of African female authors critically. The work of Chimamanda Adichie, a Nigerian female writer and author of Purple Hibiscus, is examined using Ogunyemi’s womanist philosophy. Through thorough examination, a womanist reading of this novel aims to find the many and related ways this female author articulates and demonstrates womanist ideology in the above-mentioned work. The experiment’s purpose was to examine if this female author’s womanist ideas persisted. The findings of this study are based on a careful reading of the text, with an emphasis on literary elements including characterization, narrative approach, tone, mood, and setting. Adichie’s work clearly tends to resist and usurp patriarchy, as seen by the novel’s analysis. Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie echoes womanist longing as well. On the other side, the author tends toward the ultimate womanist ideal of union and survival for man, woman, and kid.

Keywords: Womanism, Patriarchy, Feminism, Black Women.

Ordu, S., 2021. Womanism and Patriarchy in Chimamanda Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.61.

Book Review

Morteza Farhadi, Vernacularism Perspective among Iranian anthropologists

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.74-77

Nazanin Gharaeinejad1

Ali Khanmohmmadi2

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 74-77

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.74-77

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 74-77

Morteza Farhadi, Vernacularism Perspective among Iranian anthropologists

Reviewed by

Nazanin Gharaeinejad1

Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literature, English Department,University of Tehran, Iran.

Mail Id:  n_gh64@yahoo.com| ORCID ID: 0000-0001-5309-3528

 

Ali Khanmohmmadi2

Master student of Cultural Studies at AllamehTabataba’i University in Iran.

Mail Id:  ali1992khanmohammadi@gmail.com | ORCID ID: 0000-0003-0768-4217

Bibliographic Information:

Name of the Book: The culture of co-operation in Iran, An Introduction to Anthropology and Sociology of co-operation.Book1: Traditional co-operation in Irrigation and Agriculture.

Author: Morteza Farhadi

Publisher:Nashr-e Daneshgahi

Language: English

ISBN-978964017027

Price: 130500 Rial / 0.476 Dollar

Gharaeinejad, N. and Khanmohmmadi, A., 2021. Morteza Farhadi, Vernacularism Perspective among Iranian anthropologists. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.74.

Review of The Visceral Logics of Decolonization by Neetu Khanna

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.78-80

Fouad Mami

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 78-80

DOI: https://doi.org/10.47365/litinfinite.3.2.2021.78-80

Litinfinite Journal | Vol-3, Issue-2 | December, 2021 | Page: 78-80

Review of TheVisceral Logics of Decolonization byNeetu Khanna

Reviewed by

Fouad Mami

Professor, Department of English, Université Ahmed Draia, Adrar (Algeria).

Mail Id:  fouad.mami@univ-adrar.edu.dz| ORCID ID: 0000-0003-1590-8524

Bibliographic Information:

Name of the Book: The Visceral Logics of Decolonization

Author: Neetu Khanna

Publisher:Duke University Press

Pages – 200

Language: English

ISBN-10: 1478008172 / ISBN-13: ‎ 978-1478008170

Price: Kindle: $14.72; Paperback: $24.95

Mami, F., 2021. Review of The Visceral Logics of Decolonization by Neetu Khanna. LITINFINITE JOURNAL, 3(2), p.78.

DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE ISSUE Linfinite Journal Volume 3 issue 2

Cover Designed by Nandita Samanta. Nandita Samanta is a poet, a short story writer, a reviewer, an artist. She also practices as a parenting and relationship advisor, is the secretary of a creative platform Calcutta Creative Confluence and the literary convenor of ISISAR. Her writings feature regularly in many international/national anthologies, magazines, webzines and journals. Many of her poems have been translated to different languages. The poetry collection, ‘Scattered Moments’ finds a prestigious place in many Kolkata libraries, and has been translated into French and Bengali, both the versions to be published soon. Her second book of poems ’The Trapeze Of The Mind’, is available on Kindle.